pupa

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pupa

 [pu´pah] (L.)
the second stage in the development of an insect, between the larva and the imago. adj., adj pu´pal.

pu·pa

, pl.

pu·pae

(pyū'pă, -pē),
The stage of insect metamorphosis following the larva and preceding the imago.
See also: complete metamorphosis.
[L. pupa, doll]

pupa

(pyo͞o′pə)
n. pl. pu·pae (-pē) or pu·pas
An insect in the nonfeeding stage between the larva and adult, during which it typically undergoes complete transformation within a protective cocoon or hardened case. Only insects that undergo complete metamorphosis have pupal stages.

pu′pal adj.

pu·pa

, pl. pupae (pyū'pă, -pē)
The stage of insect metamorphosis following the larva and preceding the imago.
[L. pupa, doll]

pupa

a stage found in ENDOPTERYGOTES that occurs as an apparently inactive phase between the larva and adult insect. Whilst locomotion and feeding are absent, extensive developments take place in the formation of adult structures within the pupa. In LEPIDOPTERANS the pupa is also referred to as a CHRYSALIS.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the phrase "plaited in the likeness of a closely-welded scales as of a chrysalid serpent," for instance, it functions both as a metaphor for the headdress and also as a reflexive metaphor for metaphor itself.
We are Phil Howells, Jonny Davis Le Brun, Alex Walker, Ourkeith and Mick Chrysalid.
Not only does it occur in Plan, but in the little read Foul Play Suspected (a 1953 detective story) and in the more popular The Chrysalids (1958).
The Chosen One is part love story, part dystopia, part attack on religious tyranny with echoes of John Wyndham's The Chrysalids and Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale.
The horrific nature of atom bombs of the types used at Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 was to some extent appreciated from the outset--for example it was cited by the future playwright, Harold Pinter, in his bid to be exempted from compulsory military service in 1949 (12)--and the persistence of radio-active contamination was part of the theme of John Wyndham's post-nuclear-holocaust novel The Chrysalids of 1955.
As always, Wilson trusts his characters to develop along their own lines, and as a result he earns our trust as well, in one of the more affecting post-apocalyptic, reverse-frontier tales of its type since Leigh Brackett's The Long Tomorrow or John Wyndham's The Chrysalids." GARY K.
This means that the majority of the pupae are destroyed or that at least imaginal emergence is made impossible by the burial of the chrysalids.
He says that within Europe there are no restrictions on sending eggs, chrysalids, and pupae from one country to another.
Just before the chrysalids turned into moths, most of the cocoons would be dropped into boiling water, "so that the gum which held the filaments together could be melted and the filaments reeled off and spun into thread." Sunia, as the skilled overseer, had to determine the best moment to do this: too soon, and the optimal amount of silk would not be gathered; too late, and the moth would break the cocoon and hence the threads.
In The Chrysalids, he begins: "When I was quite small I used to dream of a city - which was strange because it began before I even knew what a city was."
A Closer Look at his Work, with Particular Reference to The Chrysalids', Foundation, 55 (1992), 25-36.
Sawyer is one of the world's experts on this extraordinary writer who gave us many short stories,The Day of the Triffids (1951),The Kraken Wakes (1953), The Chrysalids (1955)and The Midwich Cuckoos (1957).