chronotherapeutics


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chronotherapeutics

(kron'ō-ther-ă-pyū'tiks),
Timing of dosage of medication according to the circadian rhythms attached to the given disease.
See also: chronotherapy.

chronotherapeutics

(krŏn′ō-thĕr′ə-pyo͞o′tĭks, krō′nə-)
n. (used with sing. verb)
1. Medical treatment administered according to a schedule that corresponds to a person's daily, monthly, seasonal, or yearly biological clock, in order to maximize the health benefits and minimize adverse effects.
2. Treatment of a sleep disorder by altering an individual's sleeping and waking times and resetting his or her biological clock. In both senses also called chronotherapy.

chronotherapy

Any therapy based on the timing of physiologic and pathologic events.

Alternative medicine
The process in which a person’s daily activities are supposedly synchronised with a natural metabolic rhythm in a 24-hour cycle. Chronotherapy establishes routines of exercise, eating, work, study, rest and sleep.

Oncology
The adminstration of chemotherapy doses synchronised to the body’s circadian rhythm. Chronotherapy may increase allowable doses of chemotherapeutics, while decreasing tumour burden and chemotherapy-related side effects.

Chronotherapeutics, core concepts
▪ Predictable pattern—Bioperiodic variation in manifestations of disease that are common to all individuals.
▪ Individual pattern—Variations in chronokinetics unique to one person.
 
Chronotherapeutics, relevance
▪ Variation in intensity of symptoms over time—e.g., allergic rhinitis, angina, asthma, MI, postsurgical pain, ulcer disease.
▪ Where therapeutic-to-toxic ratio varies predictably—e.g., chemotherapy.
▪ Where pharmacokinetics are known to be biologic rhythm-dependent—e.g., antihistamines, antihypertensives, heparin, NSAIDs.
▪ Where hormonal manipulation is intended to simulate the normal temporal ebb-and-flow hormone levels—e.g., insulin in IDDM, corticosteroid and luteinising hormone-releasing hormone.

chron·o·ther·a·peu·tics

(kron'ō-thār-ă-pyū'tiks)
Timing of dosage of medication according to the circadian rhythms attached to the given disease.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Levi, "Systems chronotherapeutics," Pharmacological Reviews, vol.
Pectins as naturally occurring polysaccharides, hydrate, gel, and swell in aqueous media and have been employed in numerous delayed, modified release, colon-specific, and chronotherapeutic drug formulations [18-22].
(14.) Wirz-Justice, A., Benedetti, F, Terman, M., Chronotherapeutics for Affective Disorders: A Clinician's Manual for Light and Wake Therapy, Basel, Switzerland: S Karger AG; 2009
This GC drug represents a novel chronotherapeutic approach and has been recently approved in the United States to treat rheumatologic conditions, such as RA, polymyalgia rheumatica, and psoriatic arthritis, as well as respiratory conditions, such as COPD and asthma.
"In the treatment of affective disorders, chronotherapeutics offers a new synthesis of nonpharmacologic interventions designed to accelerate remission.
Synchronizing impaired circadian rhythms through "chronotherapeutics"--improving sleep or paradoxically staying awake most of the night--can be extremely helpful in treating patients with MDD and bipolar disorder, Dr.
This manual was written with the intent to allow clinicians to use the principles of chronotherapeutics in their treatment of patients with seasonal affective disorder, non-seasonal depression, and other psychologic and neurologic illnesses.
It is a chronotherapeutic technique used for mood disorders, particularly in unipolar and bipolar depression patients.
The significance of its clinical use as a chronotherapeutic is that its effects on circadian rhythms are exactly the opposite as those of light therapy (Figure 1).
S lithium, a first-line mood stabilizer with evidence of usefulness in treatment before chronotherapeutic interventions and in preventing suicidal behavior.