chronopharmacology

chron·o·phar·ma·col·o·gy

(kron'ō-far'mă-kol'ō-jē),
A branch of chronobiology concerned with the effects of drugs on the timing of biologic events and rhythms, and the relation of biologic timing to the effects of drugs.

chronopharmacology

Pharmacology The study of the interactions of biologic rhythms with medications; chronopharmacology is focused on 2 areas:
1. Biologic rhythm dependencies of medications and underlying mechanisms.
2. Effect of timing pharmacotherapy on biologic time structure and relationships among rhythms. See Circadian rhythm, Pharmacokinetics.

chronopharmacology

(krŏn″ō-făr″mă-kŏl′ō-jē)
A method used in pharmacokinetics to describe the diurnal changes in plasma drug concentrations.

chronopharmacology

The study of DIURNAL variations in drug absorption, distribution and excretion, and in variations in the response of biological systems to drugs at different times.
References in periodicals archive ?
Controlled release systems are based on chronopharmacology, which deals with the effects of circadian biological rhythms on drug actions.
And through another branch of study called chronopharmacology, or the study of the administration of medication at specific times where effectivity can be maximized, these growths can possibly be stopped.
Chronopharmacology is the science dealing with the optimization of drug effects and minimization of adverse effects by timing the medications in relation to the biological rhythm.
The drugs were especially chosen to ascertain the chronopharmacology of antihypertensive drugs, if any, as already discussed.
There are other specialties of growing interest within the field of chronobiology, such as chronopharmacology, chronopharmacokinetic, chronoanesthesia, chronoenergy, chronotoxicology, and chronotherapy [1].
Chronopharmacology of hydrocortisone and 9 alpha-fluorhydrocortisone in the treatment for congenital adrenal hyperplasia.
Cardiovascular chronobiology and chronopharmacology. In: Biologic Rhythms in Clinical and Laboratory Medicine edited by Touitou Y and Haus E.
They said that in human medicine, a field called "chronopharmacology" is already developing, based on the observation that some medications are far more effective if administered at one time of the day instead of another.
Researchers in chronopharmacology and chronobiology are examining circadian rhythm in hopes of finding ways to utilize this internal biological clock for better health.
The complex interaction between alcohol and the body's circadian rhythm has become a rapidly expanding area in chronopharmacology. This area has key implications for the field of alcohol research, because understanding alcohol's effects on the body's internal clock will aid scientists in designing medications and behavioral interventions for treating alcohol abuse and dependence.
Chronopharmacology ties drug therapy to rhythmic biologic alterations and looks at response in relation to time of medication administration.