chronological age


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Related to chronological age: mental age, biological age

chronological age

n.
The number of years a person has lived, used especially in psychometrics as a standard against which certain variables, such as behavior and intelligence, are measured.

chronological age

Abbreviation: CA
Age as determined by years since birth.
See also: age
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, this element offered fairly close point estimates to chronological ages for late adolescents.
*p<0.05; #p<0.0001 BA, Bone Age; BA-CA, Bone Age--Chronological Age; T, Testosterone; AH, Axillary Hair; GD, Genital Development; PH, Pubic Hair; FFM, Fat-Free Mass; CA, Chronological Age; ST, Stature;DHS, Dominant Handgrip Strength.
The chronological age of the participants of both EG and CG2 varied from 38 to 63 months (average of 49.4 for the EG and CG2).
Figure 2 shows the differences between dental and chronological age and a total number of missing teeth.
Second, chronological age categories are arbitrary in the sense that they really only mark the passage of time.
It is critical to understand these customers' search criteria and ways of thinking, feeling and acting, which are more related to their cognitive age than their chronological age (Barak & Schiffman, 1981), so that not only the products but also the shop environment and advertising campaigns may be geared effectively (Thomas & Peters, 2009).
Age-standardized and weighted means and prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for participants' chronological age, predicted heart age, the difference between predicted heart age and chronological age (defined as excess heart age).
Between-subjects factor is a chronological age for children with hearing loss, including 7–12 months (Group A), 13–18 months (Group B), and 19–24 months (Group C).
While the athletes' average chronological age was 68, their average fitness age was 43, a remarkable 25 years less.
The over-50s currently feel younger than their chronological age (Sherman, Schiffman & Mathur, 2001), rejecting descriptions such as aged or old (Mathur & al.
Older people who felt three or more years younger than their chronological age had a lower death rate compared with those who felt their age or who felt more than one year older than their actual age, researchers found.