chronograph

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chronograph

 [kron´o-graf]
an instrument for recording small intervals of time.

chro·no·graph

(kron'ō-graf),
An instrument for graphic measurement and recording brief time periods.
[chrono- + G. graphō, to record]

chronograph

/chron·o·graph/ (kron´ah-graf) an instrument for recording small intervals of time.

chronograph

[kron′əgraf]
Etymology: Gk, chronos + graphein, to record
a device that records small intervals of time, such as a stopwatch. chronographic, adj.

chronograph

an instrument for recording small intervals of time.
References in periodicals archive ?
74, is cautionary, repudiating the numismatic practice of using coins as chronographic pinpoints.
28) The chronographic tradition identifies Py- thagoras' floruit with the rise to power of Polycrates around 530 B.
2W, as argued above - something impossible under the traditional chronographic reckoning of Semonides' date.
The chronographic tradition dates Phocylides of Miletus contemporary with Theognis, giving his floruit as 544-541 B.
While none of the arguments I have presented in the last four sections is by itself definitive, I believe that the cumulative effect of all these considerations, taken together with those of sections 1 and 2, is to suggest that there is a serious case for rejecting the traditional date our chronographic sources assign Semonides and instead seeing him as a poet of the late sixth century, coeval with Xenophanes and Heraclitus.
Mesopotamian Chronicles is not only a useful volume for Assyriologists, but for other scholars in the social sciences or humanities who need up-to-date, reliable, and readable English translations of these fifty-three chronographic texts.
Since Pausanias seems to have known from his chronographic source that the reigns of Archelaos and Charillos coincided, Charillos would be the appropriate Eurypontid king.
For these prehistoric sections then, there is nothing that cannot be attributed to the chronographic source or Herodotus.
Any extra detail supplied was either Pausanias' own, or that of his chronographic source.
26 The possibility, at least, must remain that this detail occurred in Pausanias' chronographic source, with its interest in aetiology.