chronic sorrow

chronic sorrow

A cyclical, recurring, and potentially progressive pattern of pervasive sadness that is experienced by a parent or caregiver, or individual with chronic illness or disability in response to continual loss, throughout the trajectory of an illness or disability.
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Parents who have a child with a chronic medical condition experience a new reality when they recognize their child is different than what they expected or dreamed (Eakes, Burkes, & Hainsworth, 1998; Roos, 2002), and may experience intense sadness and grief, which may advance to the more complex emotion of chronic sorrow (Eakes et al., 1998).
But, if you're like me, you don't want your life to be defined by chronic sorrow.
Eakes' theory of Chronic Sorrow in parents of premature infants.
The concept of chronic sorrow offers afresh perspective for understanding the negative emotional impact of parental rejection on children.
Cameron discussed the aspects of chronic sorrow and human resiliency as well as interventional strategies people can use to gain control and live happier, healthier lives.
Chronic sorrow refers to a unique grief reaction that occurs when loss is not final, but continues to be present in the life of the griever (Roos, 2002).
Fourth, I review the notion of chronic sorrow for families living with childhood disability and discuss the utility of the concept.
The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the presence and meaning of chronic sorrow in a group of next of kin of patients with MS.
"The definition of what is considered to be an illness, how patients are defined and treated, the focus of care, the site of care, the outcomes of care, usable concepts such as grief, chronic sorrow, bereavement--all of these ideas have a history as to how and why they developed, were accepted--or were rejected."
The understanding of parenting gained from the study included parent's chronic sorrow, stress and burden, normalization, stigma, secrecy, and disclosure.
Some themes related to parenting in the literature, and evident in this study, were chronic sorrow, stress and burden, normalization, stigma, secrecy, and disclosure.
We found the participants managed chronic sorrow both effectively, which increased their comfort, and ineffectively, which resulted in discomfort.
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