chronic glaucoma


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

o·pen-·an·gle glau·co·ma

primary glaucoma in which the aqueous humor has free access to the trabecular meshwork.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chronic glaucoma

Ophthalmology A disorder caused by ↑ intraocular pressure, 2º to blockage of the circulation of the aqueous humor, which may damage the optic nerve and cause blindness Clinical ↓ vision, halos around lights–worse at night, mild headaches Management Beta-blocker eyedrops
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

chronic glaucoma

Glaucoma in which the tonometer indicates an intraocular pressure reading of up to 45 or 50, the anterior ciliary veins are enlarged, the cornea is clear, the pupil is dilated, and pain is present. During attacks vision is poor. The visual field may be normal. Cupping of the optic disk is not present in the early stages.
See also: glaucoma
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
They are still used in acute angle closure glaucoma but they now have a limited role in chronic glaucoma. They are actually contraindicated in phacogenic glaucoma because they cause a forward rotation of the ciliary body.
Chronic glaucoma gives no warning signs and no pain.
Of these chronic glaucoma sufferers, half again - more than 5,500 people - are losing parts of their vision permanently every day because their condition has not been identified or treated.
Treatment: Chronic glaucoma can be treated with prescribed eye drops to reduce the pressure within the eye or to reduce the amount of fluid produced by the eye.
And, because chronic glaucoma often causes only a very gradual loss of the ability to see to the side, most people with it are quite unaware of their problem...
In his later years, he battled chronic glaucoma and cataracts and underwent extensive surgery to restore his vision.
TREATMENTS: Chronic glaucoma is often treated using eye drops, which lower pressure in the eye either by reducing the amount of fluid produced, or improving your eye's natural drainage.
By far the most common type is chronic glaucoma, aptly dubbed the "sneak thief of sight" because it causes a gradual painless increase of pressure inside the eye.
For chronic glaucoma, a procedure called a trabeculectomy involves making a cut so the aqueous fluid can escape from the eye.
Guinness had fought chronic glaucoma and cataracts for a number of years and had extensive surgery to restore his vision.
Acute glaucoma differs from chronic glaucoma in that the pressure builds up quickly (a matter of hours) instead of gradually over months or years.
The Juventus midfield star wears sunglasses because he suffers from chronic glaucoma in his right eye.

Full browser ?