chromophobe renal cell carcinoma

(redirected from chromophobe RCC)

chromophobe renal cell carcinoma

a low-grade renal cell carcinoma composed of large polygonal cells with well-defined borders and amphophilic or pale cytoplasm. These cells grow in solid sheets, but focally they may form tubules, trabeculae, or cysts.

chromophobe renal cell carcinoma

An uncommon (4–5% of all renal tumours) renal cell carcinoma with relatively indolent growth and histologic changes of renal oncocytoma. It is thought to arise in the intercalated cells of the collecting ducts.

DiffDx
Oncocytoma, renal cell carcinoma—granular cell type.
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6,7) PAX8 is positive in almost all RCCs, including clear cell RCC, papillary RCC, chromophobe RCC, sarcomatoid RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor (MiT) family translocation RCC, and mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma (MTSC).
There is consensus that this grading system is applicable to clear cell and papillary RCC, but not to chromophobe RCC, since none of the grading systems provides prognostic information for chromophobe RCC.
Others have reported that patients with either papillary RCC or chromophobe RCC are more likely to have secondary colon cancer compared to patients with clear cell RCC; however, the literature lacks information regarding the histological subtype of RCC and synchronous gastrointestinal tumors [15].
Chromophobe RCC (CH- RCC) is the third most common subtype, comprising approximately 5% of all RCCs.
The Rosetta Kidney Cancer Test accurately classifies the four most common kidney tumors: clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC), papillary RCC, chromophobe RCC and oncocytoma.
As seen in our patient the occurrence of multifocality has been found greater in patients with papillary RCC than among patients with clear cell or chromophobe RCC and these patients are more likely to experience a contralateral kidney recurrence8.
Distinguishing oncocytoma from RCC can be difficult, especially from chromophobe RCC that shares similar histologic features and the granular cell type of clear-cell RCC.
Patients with Clear-Cell RCC have a poorer prognosis, and differences may also exist between the prognosis of patients with papillary and chromophobe RCC (Non-Clear Cell).
Renal neoplasm with eosinophilic cells should also enter the differential diagnosis, which includes entities such as oncocytoma, chromophobe RCC, tubulocystic carcinoma, unclassified RCC with rhabdoid differentiation, and MiT family translocation RCC.
Patients with BHD are at an increased risk of hybrid chromophobe-oncocytic, but also clear-cell carcinomas, chromophobe RCC, and oncocytomas.
In contrast to studies now suggest that clear cell RCC may have a worse prognosis on average compared with papillary or chromophobe RCC, although there are clearly poorly differentiated tumors in each of these subcategories that can be lethal (Moch et al, 2000; Amin et al, 2002; Lau et al, 2002; Cheville et al, 2003; Krejci et al, 2003; Beck et al, 2004.
Rosetta's Kidney Cancer Test accurately classifies the four most common kidney tumors: clear cell renal cell carcinoma, papillary RCC, chromophobe RCC and oncocytoma.