chromoblastomycosis


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Related to chromoblastomycosis: sporotrichosis

chromoblastomycosis

 [kro″mo-blas″to-mi-ko´sis]
a chronic fungal infection of the skin, usually beginning at the site of a puncture wound or other trauma on one leg or foot, but sometimes involving other areas of the body, with wartlike nodules or papillomas that may or may not ulcerate. It is usually caused by Phialophora verrucosa, Fonsecaea compactum, F. pedrosoi, or Cladosporium carrionii. Called also chromomycosis and verrucose or verrucous dermatitis.

chro·mo·blas·to·my·co·sis

(krō'mō-blas'tō-mī-kō'sis),
A localized chronic mycosis of the skin and subcutaneous tissues characterized by skin lesions so rough and irregular as to present a cauliflowerlike appearance; caused by dematiaceous fungi such as Phialophora verrucosa, Exophiala (Wangiella) dermatitidis, Fonsecaea pedrosoi, F. compacta, and Cladosporium carrionii; fungal cells resembling copper pennies form rounded sclerotic bodies in tissue, with epidermal hyperplasia and intraepidermal microabscesses.
Synonym(s): chromomycosis
[chromo- + G. blastos, germ, + mykē, fungus, + -osis, condition]

chromoblastomycosis

/chro·mo·blas·to·my·co·sis/ (kro″mo-blas″to-mi-ko´sis) a chronic fungal infection of the skin, producing wartlike nodules or papillomas that may ulcerate.

chromoblastomycosis

[krō′mōblas′tōmīkō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, chroma + blastos, germ, mykes, fungus, osis, condition
a chronic infectious skin disease caused by any multiple species to two genera of fungi Cladosporium and Phialophora found in the soil. Infection is characterized by the appearance of pruritic, warty nodules that develop in a cut or other break in the skin, occurring typically on the leg or foot. What may first appear as a small dull-red lesion gradually develops into a large ulcerated growth appearing like cauliflower tips in structure. Over a period of weeks or months additional warty growths may appear elsewhere on the skin along the path of lymphatic drainage. Common complications are secondary infection, lymphedema, and ulceration. Treatment includes surgical excision and, in some cases, topical application of systemic antibiotics. Flucytosine is the most commonly used antifungal agent. Also called chromomycosis, verrucous dermatitis. See also mycosis specific fungal infections.
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Chromoblastomycosis

blastomycosis

A suppurative granulomatous infection caused by Blastomyces dermatitidis which may disseminate from an inoculation site—cut, bruise or scrape—leaving a central scar, mimicking skin cancer.
 
At risk
Immunocompromised patients—e.g., with AIDS—are at increased risk for disseminated blastomycosis.

Epidemiology
± 4/100,000 symptomatic, many more asymptomatic.
 
Clinical-systemic
Usually acquired by inhalation, may produce dermatitis, pneumonitis or present as a systemic disease in the skin, lungs, bones, liver, spleen or CNS. Usually begins as a respiratory infection, accompanied by cough, pleuritic chest pain, adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), chills, malaise, anorexia and/or weight loss.

Management
Amphotericin B, especially for immunocompromised patients; itraconazole is the drug of choice for nonlife-threatening, non-CNS blastomycosis.

chromoblastomycosis

Chromomycosis Infectious disease An infection by various dematiaceous fungi: Fonsecaea pedrosoi, F compacta, Phialophora verrucosa, Cladosporium carrionii, Rhinocladiella aquaspersa Epidemiology Most US infections occur in whites, age 30–50, who are farmers or manual laborers Clinical Verrucoid, ulcerated, crusted lesions with pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, keratolytic microabscesses. Cf Blastomycosis, Phaeohyphomycosis.

chro·mo·blas·to·my·co·sis

(krō'mō-blas'tō-mī-kō'sis)
A localized chronic mycosis of the skin and subcutaneous tissues characterized by skin lesions so rough and irregular as to present a cauliflowerlike appearance; caused by dematiaceous fungi such as Phialophora verrucosa, P. dermatitidis, Fonsecaea pedrosoi, F. compacta, and Cladophialophora carrionii; fungal cells resembling pennies form rounded sclerotic bodies in tissue, with epidermal hyperplasia and intraepidermal microabscesses.
Synonym(s): chromomycosis.
[chromo- + G. blastos, germ, + mykē, fungus, + -osis, condition]

chromoblastomycosis

A deep fungus tropical infection of the skin, usually on the foot, caused by a variety of fungi, and acquired on splinters of decaying wood. There are warty nodules that may ulcerate. The condition is very persistent. It is also known as chromomycosis.

chromoblastomycosis

very chronic tropical fungal foot infection due to Fonsecaea, Cladosporium and Phialophora species; causing formation of large verrucous skin plaques and characterized by secondary infections and foot deformity

chromoblastomycosis (krōˈ·mō·blaˈ·stō·mī·kōˑ·sis),

n fungal infection often appearing along the lymphatic drainage path, characterized by large, wart-like lesions that are small initially but grow over the course of a few weeks to months. Also called
chromomycosis and
verrucous dermatitis.
Enlarge picture
Chromoblastomycosis.

chromoblastomycosis

infections of skin and subcutaneous tissues caused by dematiaceous fungi.
References in periodicals archive ?
We are emphasizing on the fact that consciousness about chromoblastomycosis among clinicians as well as pathologists could simplify the management strategy and provide relief from mental stress to the patients as well as the relatives.
Treatment of severe chromoblastomycosis with itraconazole and 5-flucytosine association.
The clinical features of both conditions are similar to chromoblastomycosis but negative report of smear for LD bodies and histopathology report led to the exclusion of these conditions.
The above-mentioned systemic therapy is the treatment procedure for Chromoblastomycosis.
On potassium hydroxide (KOH) mounts or histologic examination, the thick-walled cells (muriform bodies) of chromoblastomycosis are diagnostic.
Partial suppression of cell mediated immunity in chromoblastomycosis.
At places sclerotic bodies (copper penny bodies) were seen confirming the diagnosis of chromoblastomycosis (Figure 4).
agents of chromoblastomycosis are flanked by nonpathogenic species (10) growing on plant debris.
While many fungi cause chromoblastomycosis, it is most often caused by Fonsecaea pedrosoi, followed by Cladophialophora carrionii and Phialophora verrucosa, said Arnaldo Lopes Columbo, Ph.
Chromoblastomycosis belongs to the heterogeneous group of subcutaneous mycoses.
Chromoblastomycosis presents as verrucous lesions that are usually localised to the skin and subcutaneous tissue, most commonly on the legs and feet, and may spread along lymphatics [causing elephantiasis] or in immunosuppressed individuals, may disseminate through the blood stream causing extensive cutaneous and rarely systemic disease.
Other conditions that may clinically resemble lobomycosis include keloids, leprosy, leishmaniasis, chromoblastomycosis, and malignancy (2,4).