choroidal detachment

choroidal detachment 

A separation of the choroid from the sclera, usually resulting from intraocular surgery, a severe contusion, hypotony, or from a vascular disease. Fluid accumulates in the suprachoroidal space. The ciliary body may be involved. Ophthalmoscopic examination reveals dark, convex, smoothly rounded elevations of both the retina and the choroid. Intraocular pressure may be very low and some visual field defects may be present. Syn. choroidal effusion. See ocular hypotony; uveal effusion syndrome.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
uveitis (assessed with slit lamp biomicroscope and fundus condensing lenses); post traumatic patients (assessed on history and slit lamp examination); patients with intra-ocular foreign bodies (assessed with slit lamp biomicroscope and fundus condensing lenses) and patients with retinal detachment associated with choroidal detachment (assessed with slit lamp and fundus condensing lenses).
Patients were excluded if they met the following criteria: (1) previous cyclophotocoagulation or other cyclodestructive surgery, (2) the presence of glaucoma drainage device, (3) ocular infection, (4) other diseases that can affect intraocular pressure (such as choroidal detachment and subluxation of the lens), or (5) pregnancy or serious systemic disease.
USG B-scan was performed which revealed bilateral choroidal detachment and fluid collection in suprachoroidal space.
* Intra-operative choroidal detachment in macular hole surgery (Dr Chirag Bhatt)
Not only it take more time for ROSO with 20 G vitrectomy but also carries the risk of post operative wound leakage, retinal incarceration, higher intra ocular pressure (IOP) and choroidal detachment as well.6 With the advent of 23 G and 25 G transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy systems (TSVS), vitreo retinal surgery entered into a new mico incisional era.
[1] hypotony, shallow anterior chamber and choroidal detachment. Aim of glaucoma surgery is to maintain a steady flow of aqueous out of the anterior chamber through the scleral window, under the scleral flap into the subconjunctival space.
IOFB removal was achieved in 33 (94.28%) cases while IOFB removal could not be achieved in 2 (5.71%) cases because of vitreous bleed retinal and choroidal detachment. Initial BCVA and final BCVA are compared in Table 3 and 4.
However, the size of sclerostomy does not appear to increase the likelihood of postoperative flat anterior chamber or choroidal detachment, nor influence long term control of IOP.
Complications Seen During the Follow Up Period Complications Cases by Surgical Technique Phaco 1 Phaco 2 Total Scarred bleb 35% 34% 35% Choroidal Detachment 7% 9% 7% Bleb leak 5% 4% 5% Vein Occlusions 3% 1% 2% Corneal decompensation 2% 0% 2% Retinal Detachment 0.6% 0% 0.5% Endophthalmitis 0.3% 2% 0.8% Others 7% 0% 5% Total 60% 51% 58% Table 4.
Despite the advantages of not increasing the risk of cataract and being less expensive than PPV, SB can cause several possible complications, such as myopic shift in refraction (68%) [6], diplopia with extraocular muscle dysfunction (3%-50%) [6-8], choroidal detachment (23%-44%) [7], subretinal hemorrhage (3%-5.1%) [8, 9], iatrogenic scleral break (2%) [10], accidental subretinal fluid drainage (5%-8%) [8, 10], retinal breaks (0.54%-4%) [8], choroidal hemorrhage (2%) [10], retinal incarceration (2.2%-3%) [8], explant exposure (6%) [10], macular pucker (2%) [6, 9], and PVR (5%-21%) [6, 9].