choroid


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choroid

 [kor´oid]
the middle, vascular coat of the eye, between the sclera and the retina. adj., adj choroid´al. It contains an abundant supply of blood vessels and a large amount of brown pigment that serves to reduce reflection or diffusion of light when it falls on the retina. Adequate nutrition of the eye is dependent upon blood vessels in the choroid.

cho·roid

(kor'oyd), [TA]
Portion of the middle or vascular layer of the eyeball lying between the pigment epithelium and the sclera and posterior to the other parts of the vascular layer, the ciliary body, and iris.
Synonym(s): choroidea [TA]
[G. choroeidēs, a false reading for chorioeidēs, like a membrane]

choroid

(kôr′oid′) or

chorioid

(kôr′ē-oid′)
n.
The dark-brown vascular coat of the eye between the sclera and the retina. Also called choroid coat, choroid membrane.
adj.
1. Resembling the chorion; membranous.
2. Of or relating to the choroid.

choroid

noun The highly vascularised and pigmented nutrient middle layer of the eye, located between retina and sclera (the tapetum is an iridescent layer in the choroid of some eyes); part of the uvea.

cho·roid

(kōr'oyd) [TA]
The middle vascular tunic of the eye lying between the retina and the sclera.
Synonym(s): choroidea [TA] .
[G. choroeidēs, a false reading for chorioeidēs, like a fetal membrane]

choroid

The densely pigmented layer of blood vessels lying just under the retina of the eye, contributing to its fuel and oxygen supply and optical efficiency.

choroid

  1. a layer behind the retina of the vertebrate eye which contains blood vessels and pigment.
  2. resembling the CHORION.

Choroid

The part of the uveal tract behind the ciliary body. The choroid underlies and nourishes the retina and absorbs scattered light.
Mentioned in: Uveitis
References in periodicals archive ?
Mugamba, "Long-term outcome for endoscopic third ventriculostomy alone or in combination with choroid plexus cauterization for congenital aqueductal stenosis in African infants," Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics, vol.
Histopathological examination of eyes transplanted with hBMSCs revealed no pathological changes in the retina, choroid, or sclera of transplanted eyes at any time point following transplantation (Figure 5) or in control contralateral nontransplanted eyes (data not shown).
The median subfoveal choroid thicknesses were 343.5 [micro]m and 351.5 [micro]m at the second visit.
Fiona Doetsch's group uncovered that the choroid plexus secretes a wide variety of important signaling factors in the CSF, which are important for stem cell regulation throughout life.
In these patients, it seemed that the balance between production and absorption of CSF could be restored by only a small reduction in outflow from the choroid plexus of the lateral ventricle.
However, therapy of chronic conditions like diabetic edema and AMD should be addressed via injections to periocular tissue spaces such as the choroid, sub-tenon, parabulbar, sclera, etc.
To conclude, choroidal osteoma is a rare benign ossifying tumour of the choroid. The clinical picture may appear as a malignant ocular tumour.
[15-17] proposed a two-stage statistical model to detect the choroid boundaries in the 1060 nm OCT images in healthy and pathological eyes.
In this form, the choroid, a matrix of blood vessels that feed the pigment epithelium at the back of the eye, grows new blood vessels that push the retina away from the choroid.
LCT's NTCELL implant is injected directly into areas of the brain where the neurons have died off, introducing new choroid plexus cells, the same 'support' cell that exist naturally in the brain.
In these vessels, deterioration in the parameters was parallel to the exacerbation of degenerative lesions in the retina and choroid of the eye.
However, it is still not completely understood how CSCR develops,1 and three theories have so far been presented: RPE dysfunction theory, choroid dysfunction theory, and combined choroid and RPE dysfunction theory.