choristoma


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choristoma

 [kor″is-to´mah]
a mass of histologically normal tissue in an abnormal location.

cho·ris·to·ma

(kō'ris-tō'mă),
A mass formed by maldevelopment of tissue of a type not normally found at that site.
[G. chōristos, separated, + -ōma]

choristoma

Non-specialised tissue (chorista) that develops in utero and corresponds to normal cells and tissues located in abnormal sites (e.g., ectopic breast, liver or other tissues), which are called choristomas when they have a mass effect.

choristoma

Non-specialized tissue that develops in utero, which corresponds to normal cells and tissues located in abnormal sites–eg, ectopic breast, liver, or other tissues. See Neuromuscular choristoma.

cho·ris·to·ma

(kōr'is-tō'mă)
A mass formed by maldevelopment of tissue of a type not normally found at that site.
[G. chōristos, separated, + -ōma]
References in periodicals archive ?
Kan, "Salivary gland choristoma of the middle ear," International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, vol.
A case of epibulbar osseous choristoma with review of literature.
Infected lingual osseous choristoma. Report of a case and review of the literature.
We herein report a neonate who presented with glial choristoma of the tongue who developed respiratory distress due to airway obstruction.
The incidence of choristoma liver ranges from 0.24% to 0.47% and most of the cases are diagnosed at laparotomy or laparoscopy.
Choristoma of the middle ear is a rare condition characterized by the presence of normal salivary gland tissue in the middle ear space.
These features suggest a broader differential diagnostic list that includes reactive changes or spindle cell lesions, such as fibrosing pyogenic granuloma, infantile myofibromatosis, rhabdomyoma, rhabdomyomatous choristoma, or juvenile xanthogranuloma.
Dermoids are examples of choristoma or congenital circumscribed overgrowth microscopically normal tissue in an abnormal place.
These findings were consistent with a diagnosis of lingual osseous choristoma.
One tonsil (0.63%) demonstrated the presence of cartilage tissue which could be explained as a choristoma. (8) significantly none of the one hundred and fifty eight tonsils demonstrated the presence of metaplasia, atrophy or fibrosis.
We report a case of glial choristoma of the middle ear, and we review the literature on the nature and management of this lesion in this location.