chorioretinitis


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Related to chorioretinitis: retinochoroiditis, Congenital toxoplasmosis

chorioretinitis

 [kor″e-o-ret″ĭ-ni´tis]
inflammation of the choroid and retina.

ret·i·no·cho·roid·i·tis

(ret'i-nō-kō'roy-dī'tis),
Inflammation of the retina extending to the choroid.
Synonym(s): chorioretinitis
[retinochoroid + G. -itis, inflammation]

cho·ri·o·ret·i·ni·tis

(kōr'ē-ō-ret'i-nī'tis)
Inflammation in the choroid and retina with its origin in the choroid.

chorioretinitis

Any inflammatory process involving the CHOROID and the overlying RETINA of the eye.

chorioretinitis 

Inflammation of the retina and the choroid. It originates in the choroid and subsequently spreads to the retina. See nystagmus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Do, "Bilateral papillitis and unilateral focal chorioretinitis as the presenting features of syphilis," Journal of Ophthalmic Inflammation and Infection, vol.
Posterior segment lesions Number of Percentage of Percentage patients total patients of posterior segment lesions (n = 25) HIV retinopathy 7 17.5 28 CMV retinitis 5 12.5 20 Toxoplasma 3 7.5 12 Retinal detachment 3 7.5 12 Retinal vascular 2 5 8 occlusions Retinopathy of anaemia 2 5 8 Tubercular 1 2.5 4 chorioretinitis Acute retinal necrosis 1 2.5 4 Endogenous 1 2.5 4 endophthalmitis TABLE 4: Neuroophthalmic lesions.
The most common late manifestation that may occur in an untreated child exposed to Toxoplasmosis during pregnancy is chorioretinitis, which is an inflammation of the vascular coat (choroid) and retina of the eye.
Toxoplasmosis encephalitis (TE), and chorioretinitis has been described T.gondii infects herbivorous, omnivorous and carnivorous animals.
The most common symptoms among infants without vesicular lesions were eye problems (such conjunctivitis, keratoconjunctivitis, or chorioretinitis), seizures, fever, jaundice, and respiratory distress.
In addition to supplements, Knapp employed sphenopalatine blocks, using topical anesthesia, to improve all types of chorioretinitis, including macular degeneration.
Furthermore, since the parasite can cross the placenta, the primary maternal infection with T.gondii can be transmitted to the fetus and may lead to severe congenital defects such as hydrocephaly, mental retardation, chorioretinitis, visual impairment or even death in utero (2-5).
Intrauterine infection, although rare, can result in abortions or stillbirths, skin scars, ophthalmic complications (chorioretinitis, microphthalmia), and brain damage.
apiospermum has also been isolated from a wide range of body sites, causing septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, lymphocutaneous syndrome, pneumonia, endocarditis, peritonitis, meningo-encephalitis, meningitis, brain abscess, parotitis, thyroid abscess, otomycosis, sinusitis, keratitis, chorioretinitis and endophthalmitis.
Demostration of intraocular sintesis of immunoglobulin G toxoplasma antibodies for specific diagnosis of toxoplasma chorioretinitis by enzyme immunoassay.
The concomitant presence of inflammatory cells in the retina and choroid characterized chorioretinitis. Inflammatory cells were notably found among layers of optic nerve fibers and ganglion cells, or even among the external plexiform and ganglion cell layers.
Common ocular manifestations of congenital infections include chorioretinitis and cataract, with less common occurrence of microphthalmos, glaucoma, keratitis, microphthalmia, iridocyclitis, iris dystrophy, optic neuritis, retinitis (3).