chorionicity

chorionicity

(kōr″ē-o-nis′it-ē)
In a twin or multifetal pregnancy, the number of chorions in the placenta that supply blood and nourishment to the developing fetuses. Twins sharing a common placenta may experience twin-twin transfusion syndrome; those with separate blood supplies have, on average, fewer perinatal health problems.
References in periodicals archive ?
In up-to-date clinical practice, the frequency of ultrasonographic assessment is determined according to the chorionicity and growth patterns in twin pregnancies.
When triplet pregnancies are complicated with conjoined twins, accurate diagnosis of chorionicity is critical for management options and the prognosis of the normal triplet.[4],[6] Although expectant treatment is associated with a high incidence of conjoined twin demise, which leads to cerebral injuries or loss of the normal fetus due to the unidirectional blood transfusion through the placental vascular anastomosis, the only cases of the normal triplet live birth were treated this way.[5],[10] Selective termination is an ideal management in this situation which requires complete cord occlusion of the conjoined twins, and potassium chloride injection into the heart of the target fetus is not feasible.
And if a twin pregnancy is detected, chorionicity and amnionicity should be checked.
Keywords: Twin pregnancy, Stillbirth, Prospective risk, Chorionicity, Perinatal morbidity, Mortality.
Chorionicity is a straightforward determination at this time but can be difficult to determine in the second trimester if a single placental mass is all that is visible on an ultrasound.
Unclear factors in the meta-analysis data, however, including the accuracy of chorionicity determination and the lack of information on fetal surveillance at the study centers, among others, preclude recommending a change in current practice from society-supported guidelines, which indicate that ideal delivery should fall within a gestational-age range, with delivery decisions within that range depending on numerous factors.
In 2006, 60% of the twins delivered in the United States were preterm and weighed <2500g.2 Ultrasonographic examination is important for not only the determination of chorionicity and amnionicity, but also for identification of anomalies and syndromes in twin gestations.11 Timely recognition of risk factors and appropriate management measures will decrease the likelihood of adverse pregnancy outcome.
USG was performed to identify the chorionicity and congenital anomalies.
Because frequent antenatal testing may improve perinatal outcomes, accurate determination of chorionicity is fundamental and should be determined promptly and accurately (5-6).
Does chorionicity or zygosity predict adverse perinatal outcomes in twins?