chorea

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chorea

 [ko-re´ah]
the ceaseless occurrence of rapid, jerky involuntary movements. adj., adj chore´ic.
acute chorea Sydenham's chorea.
chronic chorea Huntington's chorea.
chorea gravida´rum sydenham's chorea in early pregnancy, with or without a previous history of rheumatic fever.
hereditary chorea (Huntington's chorea) see huntington's chorea.
Sydenham's chorea see sydenham's chorea.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cho·re·a

(kōr-ē'ă),
Irregular, spasmodic, involuntary movements of the limbs or facial muscles, often accompanied by hypotonia. The location of the responsible cerebral lesion is not known.
[L. fr. G. choreia, a choral dance, fr. choros, a dance]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chorea

(kô-rē′ə, kō-, kə-)
n.
Any of various disorders of the nervous system marked by involuntary, jerky movements, especially of the arms, legs, and face, and by incoordination.

cho·re′ic (-ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

chorea

Neurology A condition characterized by involuntary but seemingly well-coordinated, rapid, complex, spastic movements. See Sydenham's chorea.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cho·re·a

(kōr-ē'ă)
Irregular, spasmodic, involuntary movements of the limbs or facial muscles, often accompanied by hypotonia. The location of the responsible cerebral lesion is unknown.
See also: Huntington chorea, Sydenhamchorea
[L. fr. G. choreia, a choral dance, fr. choros, a dance]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

chorea

An involuntary, purposeless jerky movement, repeatedly affecting especially the face, shoulders and hips and caused by disease of the basal ganglia of the brain. Popularly called St. Vitus' dance. See HUNTINGTON'S CHOREA.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Chorea

A term that is used to refer to rapid, jerky, involuntary movements of the limbs or face that characterize several different disorders of the nervous system, including chorea of pregnancy and Huntington's chorea as well as Sydenham's chorea.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The patients may attempt to disguise chorea by incorporating it into mannerisms or gestures.
In recent times, most cases of Chorea appearing during pregnancy are Idiopathic and rest are caused by Rheumatic, SLE, Huntington disease, APL syndrome, Wilson's disease.
Patients with Sydenham's chorea are at risk for the development of rheumatic carditis particularly mitral stenosis and to prevent this, a regimen of daily penicillin prophylaxis should be instituted and maintained.
Of patients who present with chorea and no apparent carditis, 20% may develop rheumatic disease after 20 years.
He reports that "in the cloisters of certain churches even bishops play with their clerics, so that they even descend to the game of the circular dance or the pila." Sicard adds the term circular dance (chorea) to Beleth's statement that they descend "to the game of the pila." Sicard also abbreviated Beleth's rather negative comment that "although great churches, like that of Reims, keep this custom of playing, yet it seems more praiseworthy not to play." (7) In a separate passage, Beleth voices disfavor toward what he sees as a game (ludum) rather than a chorea, in ruling that if a cleric should die suddenly while playing a game such as the pila, he should be buried in the cemetery, but without the normal obsequies.
According to the Auxerre account, the chant Victimae paschali laudes was sung to a circular dance or chorea (carole, to use the medieval French word, from which the modern "carol" derives).
(35) Beleth and Sicard recalled that certain Fathers (Flavianus and Diodorus, according to Honorius) were responsible for changing the choir from a circle (chorea) to two straight lines, as the original pattern was too confused.
Although Honorius Augustodunensis repeats traditional denunciations of pagan behavior in his Gemma animae, written in about 1106, he is more adept than Isidore in identifying rational reasons for ritual, as is evident in his account of how choir (chorus) derives from chorea, dancing that originally signified the dance of the heavens but was converted by the faithful Jews to the service of God.