chorea


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chorea

 [ko-re´ah]
the ceaseless occurrence of rapid, jerky involuntary movements. adj., adj chore´ic.
acute chorea Sydenham's chorea.
chronic chorea Huntington's chorea.
chorea gravida´rum sydenham's chorea in early pregnancy, with or without a previous history of rheumatic fever.
hereditary chorea (Huntington's chorea) see huntington's chorea.
Sydenham's chorea see sydenham's chorea.

cho·re·a

(kōr-ē'ă),
Irregular, spasmodic, involuntary movements of the limbs or facial muscles, often accompanied by hypotonia. The location of the responsible cerebral lesion is not known.
[L. fr. G. choreia, a choral dance, fr. choros, a dance]

chorea

(kô-rē′ə, kō-, kə-)
n.
Any of various disorders of the nervous system marked by involuntary, jerky movements, especially of the arms, legs, and face, and by incoordination.

cho·re′ic (-ĭk) adj.

chorea

Neurology A condition characterized by involuntary but seemingly well-coordinated, rapid, complex, spastic movements. See Sydenham's chorea.

cho·re·a

(kōr-ē'ă)
Irregular, spasmodic, involuntary movements of the limbs or facial muscles, often accompanied by hypotonia. The location of the responsible cerebral lesion is unknown.
See also: Huntington chorea, Sydenhamchorea
[L. fr. G. choreia, a choral dance, fr. choros, a dance]

chorea

An involuntary, purposeless jerky movement, repeatedly affecting especially the face, shoulders and hips and caused by disease of the basal ganglia of the brain. Popularly called St. Vitus' dance. See HUNTINGTON'S CHOREA.

Chorea

A term that is used to refer to rapid, jerky, involuntary movements of the limbs or face that characterize several different disorders of the nervous system, including chorea of pregnancy and Huntington's chorea as well as Sydenham's chorea.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps suggesting that the spasms and jerks of the dance floor are close relatives of the contractions of chorea, Platel's dancers allowed themselves to camp it up.
Patients treated with tetrabenazine had reduced chorea; secondary outcomes of function and cognition did not improve.
While they did not dismiss these issues, which they recommended should be studied further, panelists agreed that these concerns did not justify delaying approval of the drug and that the dramatic effects on chorea made tetrabenazine a valuable treatment.
Marie's mother Agnes died from breast cancer when Marie was only 14 and the teenager took over as the main carer for her dad James, who suffered from Huntington's Chorea, and her younger brother Henry, who was just 11 at the time.
The primary involuntary movement abnormality, and often the earliest symptom, is chorea or choreoathetosis, continuous and irregular writhing and jerking movements.
The lack of excitatory drive is thought to account for hyperkinetic movement disorders such as chorea and tics (Parent et al 2000).
Out of his homey, suburban office that he shared with a younger colleague and a nurse, Welby offered wise unhurried, holistic care to patients with an extraordinary array of diseases, from leprosy to Huntington's chorea.
Depending on the facility's resident population, a nursing assistant might need special training in other types of disabilities, such as mental illness, Parkinson's disease or Huntington's chorea.
The assay also helps diagnostic labs increase testing sensitivity to streptococcal-based infections, including patients with acute rheumatic fever, acute glomerulonephritis, Sydenham's chorea, scarlet fever, pharyngitis, and other group A illnesses.
As an example, she cites Huntington's chorea, a hereditary, progressive, and ultimately fatal disease of the central nervous system.
For example, the gene for the devastating disease Huntington's chorea is found on chromosome 4.