chordoma

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Related to chordomas: chondrosarcomas

chordoma

 [kor-do´mah]
a malignant tumor arising in the axial skeleton from embryonic remains of the notochord.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

chor·do·ma

(kōr-dō'mă), [MIM*215400]
A rare neoplasm of skeletal tissue in adults, derived from persistent portions of the notochord; composed of cells arranged in lobules, with abundant myxoid stroma; some cells contain vacuoles that resemble soap bubbles (physaliphorous cells); most frequently in the region of the clivus or lumbar-sacral cord.
[(noto)chord + G. -oma, tumor]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chordoma

An encapsulated, locally invasive malignant tumour that arises from the foetal notochord in the sacrococcygeal and sphenooccipital regions.
 
Epidemiology
Predominantly in older (age 50–70) men for sacrococcygeal region and age 20–40 for sphenooccipital chordoma.
 
Management
Surgery, RT.
 
Prognosis
Recurrence is common, often years after adequate therapy.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

chor·do·ma

(kōr-dō'mă)
A rare neoplasm of skeletal tissue in adults, derived from persistent portions of the notochord.
[(noto)chord + G. -oma, tumor]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

chordoma

A slow-growing tumour of the spine arising from remnants of the primitive NOTOCHORD. Chordomas rarely spread remotely, but can cause severe local damage.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Chordomas are rare, slow-growing malignant yet locally aggressive osteolytic primary bone tumours derived from persistent notochordal remnants that principally arise in the axial skeleton.1,2 Cases of extra-axial chordomas have also been reported.3 They make up about 1% of all intracranial, 4% of primary bone and 2% of spinal tumours4,5 They are the most common primary bone tumours of spine and have a male to female ratio of 2:1.
(7) Cranial chordomas are most frequent in men than in women 2:1 and may present at any age with mean age at diagnosis being 38 years.
Rosenberg et al., "Brachyury expression in extra-axial skeletal and soft tissue chordomas: a marker that distinguishes chordoma from mixed tumor/myoepithelioma/parachordomain soft tissue," American Journal of Surgical Pathology, vol.
Chordomas are rare, representing approximately only 1%-4% of all primary bone tumors.
The surgical resection of clival chordomas describes a variety of conventional surgical approaches (transcranial, transsphenoidal, trans-oropharyngeal and maxillary osteotomy).
CT with bone window is highly efficient in detecting bone destruction, calcification, and bleeding, which can be frequently seen in chordomas. MRI has also been recommended for the primary tumor assessment because of its better display in multiplanar views and delineation of different soft tissue components of tumors and their surrounding structures.
"We herein report an exceptional case of extra-axial dedifferentiated chordoma confirmed by the expression of brachyury, the first case report of this kind," reported surgical pathologist Dr.
INTRODUCTION: Chordomas account for 2 to 4% of primary bone tumors, being the fourth most common pathology among primary bone cancers.
(3) Masses originating from the clivus include bony metastases, chordomas, chondrosarcomas and plasmacytomas.
For example, clival chordomas account for 0.15-1 % of all intracranial tumors (Erdem et al., 2003; Jian et al., 2011), there location varying depending on whether they are at the upper clival (basisphenoid) or lower clival (basiocciput) region (Stippler et al., 2009).
Studies have shown that proton therapy reduces rates of feeding tube dependency and severe weight loss for patients with oropharyngeal cancers and improves survival for patients with paranasal and nasal cavity malignancies.[i] It has also been shown to be an effective treatment modality for skull base chordomas.[ii] Furthermore, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network concluded that patients with specific head and neck cancers had better outcomes than those who received photon therapy.[iii]