chordal

(redirected from chordally)
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chord·al

(kōr'dăl),
Relating to any chorda or cord, especially to the notochord.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chordal

adjective Referring or pertaining to the notochord; notochordal.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

chord·al

(kōr'dăl)
Relating to any chorda or cord, especially the notochord.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

chordal

(kor′dăl)
Pert. to chorda, esp. the notochord.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Ryding is not the first to associate the rest of Campion's (declamatory) songs to the newly emerged chordally accompanied solo song of Italy (monody), a genre that its first major exponent, Giulio Caccini, wished to connect with Giovanni Bardi's camerata fiorentina, its discussions of Greek music, and its attempts to reform modern music on the model of Greek antiquity.
Should the members of the quartet take turns soloing while the others support them chordally? This approach would be truest to jazz tradition but lends itself awkwardly to the quartet format and re- quires a musical skill set that is often foreign to the training of classical musicians.
(They come closest to the chordally based floridity of Geminiani's violin version of his own opts cello sonatas.) The version of Sonata no.9 which the Locatelli Trio presents in the main sequence uses graces for the first movement from Cambridge, University Library, Add.
They can be summarised as follows: use of homorhythm for expressive effect, an effect heightened further when the surrounding context is imitative; division of the five-voice group into subgroupings engaging also in antiphonal response; variety in the initial ideas (homorhythm, solo voice, three-voice textures proceeding chordally, imitative bicinia, etc.); variety in pace, with white-note passages contrasting with sections either declaimed in syllabic crotchets or embellished with ornament, use of chromaticism and expressive dissonance, though without `revolutionary' undertones; an abundance of chordal combinations; themes with clear melodic profiles, some already with tonal feeling.