chondroblastoma


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chondroblastoma

 [kon″dro-blas-to´mah]
a benign tumor arising from young chondroblasts in the epiphysis of a bone.

chon·dro·blas·to·ma

(kon'drō-blas-tō'mă),
A benign tumor arising in the epiphyses of long bones, consisting of highly cellular tissue resembling fetal cartilage.

chondroblastoma

/chon·dro·blas·to·ma/ (kon″dro-blas-to´mah) a usually benign tumor derived from immature cartilage cells, occurring primarily in the epiphyses of adolescents.

chondroblastoma

[kon′drōblastō′mə] pl. chondroblastomas, chondroblastomata,
a benign tumor, derived from precursors of cartilage cells, that develops most frequently in epiphyses of the femur and humerus, especially in young men. The lesions may contain scattered areas of calcification and necrosis. Also called Codman's tumor.

chondroblastoma

A benign tumour that arises in the epiphysis or in secondary ossification centres of long bones (humerus, proximal and distal femur, proximal tibia) of young adults (< age 30).

Imaging
Well-defined lytic lesion with a fluffy cotton-wool appearance, ± sclerotic border.

chon·dro·blas·to·ma

(kon'drō-blas-tō'mă)
A benign tumor arising in the epiphyses of long bones, consisting of highly cellular tissue resembling fetal cartilage.

chondroblastoma

uncommon, painful or asymptomatic benign bone lesion of knee, talus and calcaneum, presenting on radiograph as a clearly defined round or oval bone lesion with a sclerotic border (see Table 1)
Table 1: Tumours arising in bone
Bone tumour typeExamples occurring in lower limb/foot
BenignAneurysmal bone cyst
Solitary osteochondroma
Simple/solitary bone cyst
Osteoid osteoma
Giant-cell tumour
Enchondroma
Chondroblastoma
MalignantChondrosarcoma
Ewing's sarcoma
Osteogenic sarcoma

chondroblastoma

a benign tumor arising from young chondroblasts in the epiphysis of a bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chondroblastoma (CBT) is a rare, cartilage-producing bone tumor that tends to occur in the long bones of skeletally immature individuals.
There are two forms of ABC- Primary (Occurring de novo) and secondary which complicates other benign and malignant conditions like-Fibrous Dysphasia, Osteoblastoma, Osteosarcoma, Chondroblastoma, Giant Cell tumour, chondromyxoid fibroma, non-ossifying fibroma.
Benign conditions, which are treated with some success, include giant cell tumor, chondroblastoma, as well as avascular necrosis.
KEY WORDS: chiropractic, elbow pain, chondroblastoma, osteochondral bone defect, joint swelling
A secondary ABC develops in association with other neoplasms most commonly giant bone tumor (GCT) of the bone, osteoblastoma, chondroblastoma, and fibrous dysplasia [10].
Presence of extensive surrounding reactive edema within the marrow and soft tissues, sclerotic margin, and presence of chondroid matrix are helpful features distinguishing chondroblastoma from GCT.
A rare primary benign tumor of bone, referred to as chondroblastoma, is found mostly in older children.
Meanwhile, secondary ABCs are formed from preexisting bone lesions such as angioma, nonossifying fibroma, osteoblastoma, giant cell tumors, chondroblastoma, and fibrous dysplasia.
Likewise, EG, chondroblastoma, solitary and aneurysmal bone cysts are rarely seen in adults >30 yrs.
Aneurysmal bone cyst, chondroblastoma, dermoid cyst, chondrosarcoma, giant cell reparative granuloma, and pigmented villonodular synovitis are the most important entities that should be included in the radiologic differential diagnosis.
Giant cells can also be detected in Aneurysmal bone cysts, Chondroblastoma, Brown tumors of hyperparathyroidism, Non-ossifying fibroma and Giant cell granuloma.
Other new information relates to chondroblastoma, osteoblastoma, and parosteal osteosarcoma, and the section on neoplasm simulators has been expanded to include conditions like neuropathic joint that may present as a neoplasm.