cholinesterase


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

cholinesterase

 [ko″lin-es´ter-ās]
an enzyme that splits acetylcholine into acetic acid and choline; it occurs primarily in the serum, liver, and pancreas. See also acetylcholinesterase.
true cholinesterase acetylcholinesterase.

cho·lin·es·ter·ase

(kō'lin-es'ter-ās),
One of a family of enzymes capable of catalyzing the hydrolysis of acylcholines and a few other compounds. In mammals, found in white matter of brain, liver, heart, pancreas, and serum. It is also found in cobra venom.
See also: acetylcholinesterase.

cholinesterase

(kō′lə-nĕs′tə-rās′, -rāz′)
n.
Any of several enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of esters of choline, especially acetylcholinesterase.

cholinesterase

(1) EC 3.1.1.8—synthesized in the liver, present in serum; and
(2) EC 3.1.1.7—acetylcholinesterase, which is synthesised in red cells.

Both enzymes are used to determine the extent of organophosphate exposure; the serum form (EC 3.1.1.8) is more useful in detecting acute toxicity while acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7) better reflects chronic exposure.

cholinesterase

There are 2 cholinesterases: one is synthesized in the liver and present in the serum, and the other–now formally known as acetylcholinesterase—is synthesized in the RBCs; both are used to determine the extent of organophosphate exposure; the serum form is more useful in detecting acute toxicity while acetylcholinesterase better reflects chronic exposure; some people have genetic variants of cholinesterase, which act more slowly on substrates than the normal enzyme, and they may experience prolonged apnea after anesthesia with suxamethonium-type muscle relaxants; these variant enzymes can be detected by screening before undergoing anesthesia. See Dibucaine number. Cf Acetylcholinesterase.

cho·lin·es·ter·ase

(ChE) (kō'lin-es'tĕr-ās)
One of a family of enzymes capable of catalyzing the hydrolysis of acylcholines and a few other compounds. Found in cobra venom.

cholinesterase

An enzyme that rapidly breaks down acetylcholine to acetic acid and choline so that its action as a NEUROTRANSMITTER ceases.

cholinesterase

an enzyme that hydrolyses and destroys excess ACETYLCHOLINE after it has been liberated and has produced its effect on specific sites on the postsynaptic membrane at a nerve synapse. See NERVE IMPULSE.

cho·lin·es·ter·ase

(kō'lin-es'tĕr-ās)
One of a family of enzymes capable of catalyzing the hydrolysis of acylcholines and a few other compounds. In mammals, found in white matter of brain, liver, heart, pancreas, and serum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lindesay, "Cholinesterase inhibitors and cardiovascular disease: a survey of old age psychiatrists' practice," Age and Ageing, vol.
Simultaneously, blood samples were analysed for serum cholinesterase levels at same time intervals.
Serum Cholinesterase Activity During Pregnancy, Labor and the Puerperium.
In order to understand the binding mechanisms of these compounds with cholinesterase enzymes, MD studies were performed on the most potent inhibitor; angustidine (2) and nauclefine (3).
Among the various biomarkers of pesticides exposure, the family of cholinesterases [acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE)] have widely been used as biomarker to evaluate the noxious effects of pesticides i.e.
This study compares a cholinesterase inhibitor with Ginkgo biloba for dementia of the Alzheimer type and could be a valid contribution in this debate.
Cummings, director of the Cleveland Clinic's Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, lets convenience drive the choice of which cholinesterase inhibitor to prescribe.
Handlers that are exposed to certain organophosphate and carbamate pesticides--two types of acutely toxic pesticides that attack this enzyme in pests' nervous systems--can also experience a decrease in their cholinesterase levels, which can lead to illness and death if not detected early.
Due to the diversity in biochemical properties and tissue distribution of cholinesterase (ChE) enzymes, a characterization should be performed before they are used as biomarkers for monitoring pesticide contamination.
In this article, the two classes of drugs currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of Alzheimer's disease will be reviewed: the cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEls) and the single N-methyl-D-aspatate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, the drug memantine (Clip and Save Drug Chart, 2009).
Treating patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI)--the most likely precursor to Alzheimer's disease--with cholinesterase inhibitors seems to have an initial, but perhaps unsustained, benefit over no treatment (SOR: B, inconsistent results from few trials).