cholinergic nerve


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cholinergic nerve

A nerve that uses acetylcholine as its main neurotransmitter.
See also: nerve
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Considering the relationship between the cholinergic nerve system and AD, the development of a VAChT imaging agent is important.
Atropine basically blocks the stimulation of cholinergic nerve receptors and this blockade results in the following symptoms: dilated pupils, dry and flushed appearing skin, urinary retention, elevated temperature, rapid heart rate, a significant increase in blood pressure, disorientation or delirium, seizures, hallucinations, heart rhythm disturbances, coma, and occasionally death.
This site displayed the same characteristic, high-affinity binding (nanomolar [K.sub.d]) of HC-3 as in the mammalian brain, and by mid-pluteus 1, the concentration of binding sites relative to membrane protein was > 200 fmol/mg, comparable with mammalian brain regions that are enriched in cholinergic nerve terminals (Zahalka et al.
An important feature of Alzheimer's disease is the progressive loss of cholinergic nerve cells, leading to a decline of critical chemical signals in the brain.
The network of cholinergic nerve cells--which release the chemical acetylcholine during message transmission between cells--is also affected in Alzheimer patients.
The rich innervation of the mammalian prostate is essential for maintaining its structure and function, and this innervation is mainly composed of the parasympathetic cholinergic nerve and the sympathetic adrenal nerve.[sup][1] Studies indicating a correlation between sympathetic adrenal innervation or its a[sub]1-receptor with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are numerous, but studies concerning parasympathetic cholinergic innervations and its M-receptor are uncommon.
Choline acetyltransferase, a constitutive marker for cholinergic nerve terminals, showed only minor CPF-induced changes during the period of rapid synaptogenesis.
Botulinum toxin binds with high affinity to cholinergic nerve endings, including the motor and autonomic nerves.
With this preparation, presynaptic ion channel physiology can be investigated on isolated cholinergic nerve terminals without recourse to manipulations such as fusion (Umbach et al., 1984; Edry-Schiller et al., 1991).