cholinesterase

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cholinesterase

 [ko″lin-es´ter-ās]
an enzyme that splits acetylcholine into acetic acid and choline; it occurs primarily in the serum, liver, and pancreas. See also acetylcholinesterase.
true cholinesterase acetylcholinesterase.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cho·lin·es·ter·ase

(kō'lin-es'ter-ās),
One of a family of enzymes capable of catalyzing the hydrolysis of acylcholines and a few other compounds. In mammals, found in white matter of brain, liver, heart, pancreas, and serum. It is also found in cobra venom.
See also: acetylcholinesterase.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cholinesterase

(kō′lə-nĕs′tə-rās′, -rāz′)
n.
Any of several enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of esters of choline, especially acetylcholinesterase.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cholinesterase

(1) EC 3.1.1.8—synthesized in the liver, present in serum; and
(2) EC 3.1.1.7—acetylcholinesterase, which is synthesised in red cells.

Both enzymes are used to determine the extent of organophosphate exposure; the serum form (EC 3.1.1.8) is more useful in detecting acute toxicity while acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7) better reflects chronic exposure.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cholinesterase

There are 2 cholinesterases: one is synthesized in the liver and present in the serum, and the other–now formally known as acetylcholinesterase—is synthesized in the RBCs; both are used to determine the extent of organophosphate exposure; the serum form is more useful in detecting acute toxicity while acetylcholinesterase better reflects chronic exposure; some people have genetic variants of cholinesterase, which act more slowly on substrates than the normal enzyme, and they may experience prolonged apnea after anesthesia with suxamethonium-type muscle relaxants; these variant enzymes can be detected by screening before undergoing anesthesia. See Dibucaine number. Cf Acetylcholinesterase.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cho·lin·es·ter·ase

(ChE) (kō'lin-es'tĕr-ās)
One of a family of enzymes capable of catalyzing the hydrolysis of acylcholines and a few other compounds. Found in cobra venom.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cholinesterase

An enzyme that rapidly breaks down acetylcholine to acetic acid and choline so that its action as a NEUROTRANSMITTER ceases.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

cholinesterase

an enzyme that hydrolyses and destroys excess ACETYLCHOLINE after it has been liberated and has produced its effect on specific sites on the postsynaptic membrane at a nerve synapse. See NERVE IMPULSE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

cho·lin·es·ter·ase

(kō'lin-es'tĕr-ās)
One of a family of enzymes capable of catalyzing the hydrolysis of acylcholines and a few other compounds. In mammals, found in white matter of brain, liver, heart, pancreas, and serum.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012