choline


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choline

 [ko´lēn]
an amine that occurs in phosphatidylcholine and acetylcholine, and is an important methyl donor in intermediary metabolism. Choline is a lipotropic agent, a substance that decreases liver fat content by increasing phospholipid turnover. It was formerly considered to be a B vitamin and is now classified as a pseudovitamin, although it is still sometimes classified as part of the vitamin B complex. Vitamin B12 and folacin are involved in the synthesis of choline.
choline acetylase (choline acetyltransferase) an enzyme that brings about the synthesis of acetylcholine.
choline magnesium trisalicylate see under trisalicylate.
choline salicylate see salicylate.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cho·line

(kō'lēn),
agent found in most animal tissues either free or in combination as lecithin (phosphatidylcholine), acetate (acetylcholine), or cytidine diphosphate (cytidine diphosphocholine). It is included in the vitamin B complex. Several salts of choline are used in medicine.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

choline

(kō′lēn′)
n.
A natural amine, C5H15NO2, often classed in the vitamin B complex, that is a constituent of lecithin and other phospholipids and is a precursor of certain biologically important molecules, such as acetylcholine.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

choline

A chemical present in most tissues, either free or combined with acetate (acetylcholine, which is critical for synaptic transmission), cytidine diphosphate or lecithin (phosphatidylcholine); it is included in the vitamin B complex.

Alternative medicine
Some providers of alternative healthcare have recommended choline to manage body odour, convulsions and tardive dyskinesia.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cho·line

(kō'lēn)
An amine found in most animal tissues. It is included in the vitamin B complex; as acetylcholine, it is essential for synaptic transmission. Several salts of choline are used in medicine.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

choline

One of the B vitamins necessary for the metabolism of fats and the protection of the liver against fatty deposition. The important NEUROTRANSMITTER acetylcholine is formed from it.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

choline

an organic base which is a constituent of ACETYLCHOLINE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

cho·line

(kō'lēn)
Agent found in most animal tissues either free or in combination as lecithin, acetate, or cytidine diphosphate; included in vitamin B complex.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The primary sources of dietary choline are found in beef, eggs, dairy products, fish, and chicken, with much lower levels found in nuts, beans, and cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli.
If choline is not obtained in the levels needed from dietary sources then supplementation strategies will be required."
"Choline is presently excluded from UK food composition databases, major dietary surveys, and dietary guidelines."
The study was conducted at the University of Colorado and Denver Health Medical Center's Prenatal Clinic, with prenatal assessments of maternal infection, C-Reactive Protein (CRP, a marker of maternal inflammation), and the mothers' choline levels.
The experiment was carried out in a completely randomized design with a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement, including two feeding programs (ad libitum or early feed restriction) and three states of lipotropic supplementation (a control diet, 150 mg/kg carnitine as L-carnitine and 1,000 mg/kg choline as choline chloride).
Choline is present in a range of foods including green vegetables, mushrooms, meat, poultry, fish, and especially eggs and liver.
For example, Yavar Moghimi, MD, who is the behavioral health director for a Medicaid managed care organization in Washington, recently informed me that its clinical policy committee approved a policy highlighting the evidence behind choline supplements during pregnancy.
Choline chloride, a typical form of choline added to the animal diets, has some disadvantages such as high hygroscopicity, acceleration of oxidative loss of vitamins, and the formation of trimethylamine (TMA) in the gastrointestinal tract of the birds [10].
MRS showed that patients with high grades of malignancy had high peaks of choline, decreased peaks of NAA while choline creatine ratio was more than 1.5.
When expectant mothers consume sufficient amounts of the nutrient choline during pregnancy, their offspring gain enduring cognitive benefits, a new Cornell study suggests.