cholesteatoma


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cholesteatoma

 [ko″le-ste″ah-to´mah]
a cystlike mass with a lining of stratified squamous epithelium, filled with desquamating debris frequently including cholesterol. Cholesteatomas are most common in the middle ear and mastoid region secondary to trauma or infection that undergoes faulty healing so that epithelium invaginates.

cho·les·te·a·to·ma

(kō'les-tē'ă-tō'mă),
1. Squamous metaplasia or extension of squamous cell epithelium inward to line an expanding cystic cavity that may involve the middle ear or mastoid, erode surrounding bone, and become filled with a mass of keratinized squamous cell epithelial debris, usually resulting from chronic otitis media. The lesion often contains cholesterol clefts surrounded by inflammatory and foreign body giant cells, hence the name cholesteatoma.
2. An epidermoid cyst arising in the central nervous system in humans or animals.
[cholesterol + G. stear (steat-), tallow, + -ōma, tumor]

cholesteatoma

/cho·le·ste·a·to·ma/ (-ste″ah-to´mah) a cystlike mass lined with stratified squamous epithelium filled with desquamating debris, often including cholesterol, usually in the middle ear and mastoid region.

cholesteatoma

[kōles′tē·ətō′mə]
Etymology: Gk, chole + stear, fat, oma, tumor
a cystic mass composed of epithelial cells and cholesterol that is found in the middle ear and occurs as a congenital defect or as a serious complication of chronic otitis media. The mass may occlude the middle ear, or enzymes produced by it may destroy the adjacent bones, including the ossicles. Surgery is required to remove a cholesteatoma. See also otitis media.

cholesteatoma

Dermatology
A benign plug of keratinised squamous epithelium and cholesterol found in the middle ear after acute otitis media.
 
Clinical
Hearing loss, ear fullness, and pain.
 
Neuropathology
Epidermoidoma, see there.

cholesteatoma

Dermatology A benign plug of keratinized squamous epithelium and cholesterol in the middle ear post acute otitis media Clinical Hearing loss, ear fullness, pain

cho·les·te·a·to·ma

(kō'lĕ-stē'ă-tō'mă)
1.A mass of keratinizing squamous epithelium and cholesterol in the middle ear, usually caused by chronic otitis media, with squamous metaplasia or extension of squamous epithelium inward to line an expanding cystic cavity that may involve the mastoid and erode surrounding bone.
2. An epidermoid cyst arising in the central nervous system in humans or animals.
[cholesterol + G. stear (steat-), tallow, + -ōma, tumor]

cholesteatoma

A tumour-like mass of cells, shed by the outer layer of the skin of an infected eardrum, which relentlessly invades the middle ear through a perforation in the drum, to cause serious internal damage. The condition was once often fatal but advances in microsurgical management with radical clearance of all disease tissue and the use of fibrin glue and bone paté have greatly improved the outlook.

Cholesteatoma

A cystic mass of cells in the middle ear, occurring as a congential defect or as a serious complication of a disease or traumtic condition of the ear.
Mentioned in: Ear Surgery, Mastoidectomy

cho·les·te·a·to·ma

(kō'lĕ-stē'ă-tō'mă)
A mass of keratinizing squamous epithelium and cholesterol in the middle ear, usually caused by chronic otitis media, with squamous metaplasia or extension of squamous epithelium inward to line an expanding cystic cavity that may involve the mastoid and erode surrounding bone.
[cholesterol + G. stear (steat-), tallow, + -ōma, tumor]

cholesteatoma (kəles´tēətō´mə),

n a cystic mass composed of epithelial cells and cholesterol that is found in the middle ear and occurs either as a congenital defect or as a serious complication of chronic otitis media.

cholesteatoma

a cystlike mass with a lining of stratified squamous epithelium, filled with desquamating debris frequently including cholesterol, which occurs in the meninges, central nervous system and bones of the skull, but most commonly in the choroid plexus of the ventricles, and especially in horses and other Equidae. Causes signs of increased intracranial pressure, initial excitement followed by somnolence and apathy. Hydrocephalus may be the end-stage.

Patient discussion about cholesteatoma

Q. Is cholesteatoma a form of cancer? My ear Doctor diagnosed me with cholesteatoma. I am very scared. Does this mean I have cancer? Can I die from this?

A. Cholesteatomas are not a form of cancer. They are benign tumors. They can destroy the bones of hearing as they grow, especially when the ear is infected or if water gets into the middle ear with other infections.
Cholesteatomas are not life threatening but should be treated since they can cause complications if are not treated. If not treated, cholesteatomas will eventually erode the bone leading into the inner ear. This can cause nerve loss and deafness as well as severe imbalance and dizziness. The thin plate of bone that separates the roof of the ear from the brain can also be eroded by cholesteatomas. This exposes the covering of the brain. In extreme situations, it can lead to brain infection and other severe complications.

More discussions about cholesteatoma
References in periodicals archive ?
CT will demonstrate nonspecific soft tissue density in the middle ear, the size and location of which will be determined by the type and extent of the cholesteatoma (Figure 5A-B).
Since the treatment for cholesteatoma is surgical, prompt referral and surgical management can lead to a decrease in serious and life-threatening complications.
In 1965, Derlacki and Clemis proposed criteria for CC as a cholesteatoma discovered behind an intact tympanic membrane with no history of otorrhea, prior otological intervention or previous perforations [5].
The most visible symptom of cholesteatoma is a foul smelling discharge from the ear and slight hearing loss.
The organism was probably sensitive to ampicillin, considering the low MIC and the expected serum concentration of the drug, but diffusion into the middle ear may have been poor or the local conditions caused by the cholesteatoma may have influenced the poor outcome of initial therapy.
Cholesteatoma usually develops in the setting of chronic middle ear disease and chronic eustachian tube dysfunction.
Weber is a leader in implantable hearing devices, skull-base tumor surgery, facial nerve disorders, acoustic neuromas, cholesteatoma surgery and the surgical management of vertigo disorders.
Later that day, the otolaryngologist diagnoses her with a cholesteatoma and schedules surgery to avoid hearing loss in the child.
The most common complications of tympanic membrane perforations are conductive hearing loss, secondary infection, cysts, and cholesteatoma (a type of skin cyst located in the middle ear) formation.
An otherwise healthy 21-year-old woman presented to the outpatient clinic with advanced cholesteatoma of the skull base involving the petrous apex (figure 1).
Our exclusion criteria included: patients with cholesteatoma, patients who had previous surgery, anatomical factors predisposing patients to recurrent ear infection, patients with foreign bodies, cerebrospinal fluid otorrhoea and patients who had received systemic or topical antibiotics in the 2 weeks prior to presenting to the hospital.
Among specific topics are audiologic testing and interpretation, complications of cholesteatoma and otitis media, congenital hearing loss, surgical therapy for vertigo, and superior canal dehiscence syndrome.