choleric


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Related to choleric: melancholic

bil·ious

(bil'yŭs),
1. Synonym(s): biliary
2. Relating to or characteristic of biliousness.
3. Formerly, denoting a temperament characterized by a quick, irritable temper. Synonym(s): choleric

choleric

[kol′ərik, kəler′ik]
having a hot temper or an irritable nature.

choleric

(1) Bilious (obsolete usage). 
(2) Irascible; temperamental.

bil·ious

(bil'yŭs)
1. Relating to or characteristic of biliousness.
2. Formerly, denoting a temperament characterized by a quick, irritable temper.
Synonym(s): choleric.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this system, physiognomic schemata might reveal standardized personality types (sanguine, choleric, phlegmatic, melancholic, etc.
I SET out below a few observations on the choleric views of Mr George Roddam Currie carried prominently in The Journal (Agenda, November 29).
However, corporeality was also identified in Donne's time by the four humors in the body: phlegmatic, sanguine, choleric, and melancholic.
Fluellen protests, "Captain MacMorris, I think, look you, under your correction, there is not many of your nation"--and the choleric Irishman interrupts, "Of my nation?
Terribly impatient, choleric, 1 get furious and sometimes extremely irksome.
It was September, and I was there to see for myself the "Frankencorn" that haunts activists' choleric imaginations.
Whether a person was melancholic, sanguine, choleric, or phlegmatic was important, but this was influenced also by aspects of identity we recognize today when describing who we are.
o o Electrowetting + Choleric liquid crystal display (ChLCD) + Photonic Crystal.
Jolly's company was especially fluid, in part because the actor/manager had what Elector Palatine Charles Louis described as "colera" (a choleric disposition) (Holland 79): just before returning to England in 1660, he was evicted from Nuremberg for beating up one of his players.
1758 and 1759), described the characteristics of each based on the classical temperaments (the sanguine, choleric, melancholic and phlegmatic).
While his master was often "described in situations revealing his choleric rage, notorious impatience, uncompromising stance, aggressiveness, and sarcastic rejoinders, Ibn Al Qayyim [was] perceived as a profoundly different, rather sanguine individual".