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choke

 [chōk]
1. to interrupt respiration by obstruction or compression; called also strangle.
2. the condition resulting from such interruption; called also strangulation.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

choke

(chōk),
1. To prevent respiration by compression or obstruction of the larynx or trachea; (for example, water choke can lead to laryngospasm).
2. Any obstruction of the esophagus in herbivorous animals by a partly swallowed foreign body.
[M.E. choken, fr. O.E. āceōcian]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

choke

(chōk)
v. choked, choking, chokes
v.tr.
To interfere with the respiration of by compression or obstruction of the larynx or trachea.
v.intr.
To have difficulty in breathing, swallowing, or speaking.
n.
The act or sound of choking.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Ballistics The narrowing of the cylinder bore of a shotgun at the muzzle, which minimizes the spread of shot as the shot leaves the barrel
Forensics verb To intentionally obstruct the upper airways of another individual by external compression, at the level of the trachea
Medspeak verb To suffer the sensation of or the actual obstruction of the upper airways
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

choke

Clinical medicine verb To suffer a sensation of obstruction of the upper airways Forensic pathology verb To intentionally obstruct the upper airways of another person by external compression, at the level of the trachea. See Choke hold, Strangulation.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

choke

(chōk)
To prevent respiration by compression or obstruction of the larynx or trachea.
[M.E. choken, fr. O.E. āceōcian]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
On the mental status examination, the patient was alert and oriented, with constant preoccupation with excessive fear of being choked if she ate food.
I am not sure how this one got started but I often heard it as a youngster and it may have had something to do with the fact that guns in .410 were customarily choked Full in those days.
Mr Young was on a soft food diet after he had earlier choked on a piece of meat.
The choked splits will shorten the corner and give the running back a better path to run.
It was not possible, using information obtained in NEISS-AIP, to distinguish cases in which the child choked on a substance that entered and blocked the airway from other cases in which the child choked as the result of pharyngeal irritation or an esophageal foreign body.
Pc Julie Kissack told an inquest at Pontypridd Magistrates' Court: ``I believe she had choked on a chocolate.
The bores of l2-gauge guns can vary anywhere from .720 to .740 inch among various manufacturers, but regardless of what the bore actually measures, the barrel is choked full if its choke diameter is .035 inch smaller than the bore.
During that period, the commission reported, 11 children died from choking on deflated or burst balloons; 10 died from tricycle accidents in which they were hit by a car or rode into a swimming pool; and 8 choked to death on balls.
When cold, the 044C is choked as usual, but once warmed, it can sit for two hours and still start reliably without further choking.
A three-year-old boy died after he choked while eating 12 grapes as part of a Spanish New Year tradition.
And while it may be hard to believe, some infants have choked on pacifiers.