choke

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choke

 [chōk]
1. to interrupt respiration by obstruction or compression; called also strangle.
2. the condition resulting from such interruption; called also strangulation.

choke

(chōk),
1. To prevent respiration by compression or obstruction of the larynx or trachea; (for example, water choke can lead to laryngospasm).
2. Any obstruction of the esophagus in herbivorous animals by a partly swallowed foreign body.
[M.E. choken, fr. O.E. āceōcian]

choke

(chōk)
1. strangle; to interrupt respiration by obstruction or compression.
2. strangulation; the condition resulting from such an interruption.
3. (pl.) a burning sensation in the substernal region, with uncontrollable coughing, occurring during decompression.

choke

(chōk)
v. choked, choking, chokes
v.tr.
To interfere with the respiration of by compression or obstruction of the larynx or trachea.
v.intr.
To have difficulty in breathing, swallowing, or speaking.
n.
The act or sound of choking.

choke

Etymology: ME, choken
to interrupt breathing by compression or obstruction of the larynx or trachea.
Ballistics The narrowing of the cylinder bore of a shotgun at the muzzle, which minimizes the spread of shot as the shot leaves the barrel
Forensics verb To intentionally obstruct the upper airways of another individual by external compression, at the level of the trachea
Medspeak verb To suffer the sensation of or the actual obstruction of the upper airways

choke

Clinical medicine verb To suffer a sensation of obstruction of the upper airways Forensic pathology verb To intentionally obstruct the upper airways of another person by external compression, at the level of the trachea. See Choke hold, Strangulation.

choke

(chōk)
To prevent respiration by compression or obstruction of the larynx or trachea.
[M.E. choken, fr. O.E. āceōcian]

choke

to interrupt respiration by obstruction or compression, or the condition resulting from such interruption. See also esophageal obstruction.

choke chain
a string of metal links which, when looped through an end link, forms a noose. It is commonly used as a collar for dogs, particularly in training or for control of large, strong or unruly dogs as tension on the attached lead tightens the noose around the dog's neck giving great control.
choke chain injury
soft tissue injury and fracture on luxation of the hyoid apparatus can occur with excessive force. Choke chains may also become imbedded in the tissues of growing dogs.
References in periodicals archive ?
I know those days well; I was quite skilled at giving collar corrections with choke chains and attained several high-scoring obedience titles with my dogs using those methods.
Some owners believe their dogs need more serious deterrents than those listed above, such as choke chains and prong collars, but these must be used with caution.
But she doesn't believe in draconian methods of choke chains and shouting.
Just slide the aluminum rod along an included 4-foot leash and apply gentle downward pressure -- the positive, humane technique means no more choke chains or harsh verbal commands.
GONE are the days of Barbara Woodhouse, choke chains and bringing dogs to heel.
CHOKE chains can cause serious damage to a dog's neck, yet they are still widely used.
During the three-week trial, a series of dog handlers, who were told they would not face disciplinary proceedings if they gave evidence, told how they'd hanged dogs by their choke chains over fences or a 5ft wooden wall used for jumping and then kicked them in the stomach.
HANGING the animals by choke chains over fences and walls so all four paws were off the ground, then kicking or punching them in the stomach.
1 GET RID OF IT: Get rid of anything aversive that causes unnecessary pain or stress, including shock collars, choke chains, and prong collars, and penny cans or throw chains.
Contact your local dog training class, ensuring that they only use positive training methods and do not allow choke chains to be used.
Choke chains, physical punishment, sprays and water bombs etc are no longer used by trainers that know their stuff.