choanal atresia


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Related to choanal atresia: CHARGE syndrome

atresia

 [ah-tre´zhah]
congenital absence or closure of a normal body opening or tubular structure; see also obstruction. adj., adj atret´ic.
anal atresia (atresia a´ni) imperforate anus.
aortic atresia
1. congenital absence of the aortic orifice.
2. absence or closure of the aortic orifice, a rare congenital anomaly in which the left ventricle is hypoplastic, so that oxygenated blood passes from the left into the right atrium through a septal defect, and the mixed venous and arterial blood passes from the pulmonary artery to the aorta by way of a patent ductus arteriosus.
aural atresia absence of closure of the auditory canal.
biliary atresia congenital obliteration or hypoplasia of one or more components of the bile ducts, resulting in persistent jaundice and liver damage.
choanal atresia blockage of the posterior nares. When the blockage is bilateral in a newborn, it produces acute respiratory distress because neonates are nose-breathers. Diagnosis is confirmed if a catheter cannot be passed through the nares. Until surgery is done to relieve the obstruction, insertion of an airway may be necessary.
esophageal atresia congenital lack of continuity of the esophagus, commonly accompanied by tracheoesophageal fistula, and characterized by accumulations of mucus in the nasopharynx, gagging, vomiting when fed, cyanosis, and dyspnea. Treatment should begin with suction of the upper esophageal pouch, followed by surgical repair by esophageal anastomosis and division of the fistula as soon as the infant's general condition permits.
follicular atresia (atresia folli´culi) the normal death of the ovarian follicle when unfertilized.
laryngeal atresia congenital lack of the normal opening into the larynx.
mitral atresia congenital obliteration of the mitral orifice; it is associated with hypoplastic left heart syndrome and transposition of great vessels.
prepyloric atresia congenital membranous obstruction of the gastric outlet, characterized by vomiting of gastric contents only. Called also pyloric atresia.
pulmonary atresia congenital severe narrowing or obstruction of the pulmonary orifice, with cardiomegaly, reduced pulmonary vascularity, and right ventricular atrophy. It is usually associated with tetralogy of fallot, transposition of great vessels, or other cardiovascular anomalies.
pyloric atresia prepyloric atresia.
tricuspid atresia absence of the tricuspid orifice, circulation being made possible by an atrial septal defect.
 Tricuspid atresia, here displaying a ventricular septal defect and normally related great arteries, the arrows showing the altered flow of blood through the heart. From Dorland's, 2000.
urethral atresia imperforation of the urethra.

cho·a·nal a·tre·si·a

atresia due to congenital failure of one or both choanae to open owing to the failure of the bucconasal membrane to involute. It results in nasal obstruction and, if bilateral, can endanger neonates because they are obligatory nasal breathers.

choanal atresia

Posterior choanal atresia ENT A partial or complete obstruction of bony–90% of cases or membranous passages from the nasal cavity to the nasopharynx, due to a persistent nasopharyngeal or buccopharyngeal membrane Management Transpalatal removal of obstruction and part of the posterior nasal septum, to prevent scarring; if membranous, probe perforation, laserization, cauterization may suffice.

cho·a·nal a·tre·si·a

(kōă-năl ă-trēzē-ă)
Atresia due to congenital failure of one or both choanae to open owing to the failure of the bucconasal membrane to involute; results in nasal obstruction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coloboma Congenital failure of fusion of the lateral halves of the vertebral body due to persistent Choanal atresia notochord tissue, giving the appearance of a butterfly on X-ray.
The parents' wish was to attempt the choanal atresia repair first, with the understanding that if it was unsuccessful, tracheostomy tube placement would likely be required in order for the infant to leave the hospital.
(6.) Tucker K and Lipson A: Choanal atresia as a feature of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting (EEC) syndrome: a further case.
KEYWORDS: Neonate, CHARGE Syndrome, Choanal Atresia, Heart defects.
Computed tomography (CT) revealed that the distress was indeed caused by a bilateral mixed bony and membranous choanal atresia (figure 1, A), a finding that was confirmed by nasal endoscopy Figure 1.
Choanal atresia occurs when the posterior nasal cavity fails to communicate with nasopharynx.
Choanal atresia and/or stenosis (Figure-1), subglottic and tracheal stenosis (Figure-2), and bronchial stenosis (Figure-3) were the commoner lesions observed, while foreign body aspiration (Figure-4) was also noted in the study.
Previous studies of women living in areas with TCE-or PCE-contaminated drinking water have suggested an association between TCE exposure, and cardiac defects, oral clefts, neural tube defects (NTDs), and choanal atresia [Bow et al.
Images of a case of unilateral choanal atresia diagnosed in a 35-year-old woman are presented.
(4) Five years earlier, Beste et al had reported that gastric refluxate reached as far as the choanae in 4 children with bilateral choanal atresia. (5) Again in 1999, Bothwell et al demonstrated the importance of gastric reflux in the pathogenesis of chronic sinusitis in children.
Other causes include choanal atresia or stenosis, nasal septal deviation, enlarged tongue, and facial abnormalities, such as those seen in patients with Crouzon's disease (craniofacial dysostosis) or trisomy 21.