chlorosis


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chlor·o·sis

(klōr-ō'sis),
Rarely used term for a form of chronic hypochromic microcytic (iron deficiency) anemia, characterized by a great reduction in hemoglobin out of proportion to the decreased number of red blood cells; observed chiefly in females from puberty to the third decade and usually associated with diets deficient in iron and protein.
[chloro- + G. -osis, condition]

chlorosis

(klə-rō′sĭs)
n.
1. The yellowing or whitening of normally green plant tissue because of a decreased amount of chlorophyll, often as a result of disease or nutrient deficiency.
2. An iron-deficiency anemia, primarily of young women, characterized by a greenish-yellow discoloration of the skin. Also called greensickness.

chlo·rot′ic (-rŏt′ĭk) adj.
chlo·rot′i·cal·ly adv.
A term first used in 1615 by J. Varandal for iron-deficiency anemia with yellow-green skin pallor of young women

chlorosis

A greenish tinge to the skin formerly associated with severe iron deficiency anaemia in malnourished young women. It is now almost unknown in developed countries.

chlorosis

a yellowing of plant leaves caused by lack of CHLOROPHYLL pigment due to mineral deficiency (e.g. that of magnesium, iron) or disease (e.g. virus yellows) which results in a decrease in photosynthetic rate.
References in periodicals archive ?
The symptoms of Mg deficiency were poor leaf formation, with irregular borders, and marked internal chlorosis. This chlorosis occurs because Mg is an important constituent of the chlorophyll, a greenish pigment found in chloroplasts that is responsible for photosynthesis.
Furthermore, leaf chlorosis is a typical symptom resulting from NPK deficiency; the more severe the deficiency is, the greater the chlorosis rate.
* Leaf, necrosis-free chlorosis of Botosani 1 population, partial for a start and total in time (a);
The damage level of the cuttings was evaluated at 60 days after planting, and four levels of damage were identified: (1) cuttings without symptoms, (2) cuttings with symptoms of chlorosis, (3) cuttings with rot, and (4) necrotic or dead cuttings.
Lastly, I used binary logistic regression to determine if treatment was a significant predictor of the likelihood of leaf chlorosis in donor plants.
This is known as chlorosis (loss of chlorophyll), where overall growth is impaired and older leaves begin to drop off.
Both groups showed disease symptoms, most notably chlorosis, some necrosis, and stunted growth.
Beginning in July 2010, and annually since, symptoms of brown to black foliar spotting with margins of chlorosis and signs of abundant uredinia production were observed on plots of 3 year-old 'Alamo' and 9 year-old 'EG1101' switchgrass, established at the Leveck Animal Research Facility in Starkville, Mississippi (Figures.
A: Green veins and yellow away from the veins is an indication of chlorosis, most likely due to an iron deficiency.