chlorhexidine


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chlorhexidine

 [klor-hek´sĭ-dēn]
an antibacterial compound used in antimicrobial skin cleansers for surgical scrub, preoperative skin preparation, and cleansing skin wounds.

chlorhexidine

/chlor·hex·i·dine/ (klor-heks´ĭ-dēn) an antibacterial effective against a wide variety of gram-negative and gram-positive organisms; used also as the acetate ester, as a preservative for eyedrops, and as the gluconate or hydrochloride salt, as a topical anti-infective.

chlorhexidine

[-hek′sidēn]
an antimicrobial agent used as a surgical scrub, hand rinse, and topical antiseptic. It is effective against gram-positive organisms, gram-negative organisms, aerobes, facultative anaerobes, and yeast.

chlorhexidine

A disinfectant agent widely used in surgery for preoperative skin cleansing and for sterilizing instruments by soakage. The drug is on the WHO official list. A brand name is Hibitane.

chlorhexidine

; Savlon; Hydrex 0.05% chlorhexidine (acetate or gluconate) in industrial methylated spirit (IMS) or water; powerful topical antiseptic effective against a wide range of skin flora, but non-effective against mycobacteria, Pseudomonas or spore forms; incompatible with soap; used for skin cleansing (allow to evaporate to dry for 5 minutes after application); 4% chlorhexidine gluconate in solution (Hibitane) is used as a preoperative surgical scrub

antiseptic 

An agent that kills or prevents the growth of bacteria. This term is generally restricted to agents that are sufficiently non-toxic for superficial application to living tissues. These include the preservatives for eye drops and contact lens solutions. Examples of antiseptics are alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide, chlorbutanol, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, thimerosal (or thiomersalate). Other agents that are too toxic to be applied to living tissues are called disinfectants and are used to sterilize instruments and apparatus. See disinfection; ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid; neutralization; sterilization.

chlor·hex·i·dine

(klōr-heksi-dēn)
A bis-biguanide useful as a topical antiseptic. The gluconate form is used as an oral rinse to inhibit oral bacteria in some conditions.

chlorhexidine (CHX) gluconate,

n brand names: Peridex, PerioGard;
drug class: antiinfective oral rinse;
action: absorbed by tooth surfaces, dental plaque, and oral mucosa; sustained reduction of plaque organisms;
uses: as a rinse as a part of treatment of periodontal disease, irrigation during periodontal procedures, and possibly as an aseptic prerinse before dental procedures.

chlorhexidine

a bisbiguanide antiseptic with antibacterial, antifungal and some antiviral activity; used in skin cleansers for surgical scrub, preoperative skin preparation, cleansing skin wounds and teat dips. Used as the acetate, gluconate or hydrochloride salts. Proprietary names are Hibitane, Nolvasan.

chlorhexidine digluconate
used as a sclerosing agent for chemical vasectomy in dogs.
chlorhexidine teat dip
0.5 to 1.0% chlorhexidine in polyvinylpyrrolidone or as 0.3% solution in water.
References in periodicals archive ?
I have used chlorhexidine on two of my grandchildren,' said Alhaja M.
10 Recently 2% chlorhexidine is recommended for root canal irrigations and medicaments.
18) Finally, in a meta-analysis that included 16 randomized and nonrandomized studies with 17,932 patients, Chlebicki and associates concluded that there was no significant reduction in SSIs with whole-body bathing with chlorhexidine compared with bathing with soap or placebo or with no bathing (RR, 0.
Most commonly used therapeutic agents include chlorhexidine digluconate, chlorhexidine acetate and fluconazole.
2 per 1,000 live births among infants treated with chlorhexidine and 13.
Demographic and perinatal characteristics of the neonates in the two groups of mother's milk and topical chlorhexidine solution are shown in Table-I.
4 The most common skin preparation agents used today include products containing iodophor or chlorhexidine gluconate.
In the studies of chlorhexidine on laryngoscope handles (Howell et al.
These patients underwent skin preparation with a 5-minute scrub with 4% wt/vol chlorhexidine solution followed by application of 2% chlorhexidine gluconate and 70% isopropyl alcohol.
2% chlorhexidine was evaluated over chlorhexidine alone, with saline as a negative control in reducing the microbial counts in the aerosol produced during ultrasonic scaling.
Chlorhexidine is the antimicrobial agent most familiar to dental professionals for prevention of dental caries.
In the comparison between groups of chlorhexidine mouthwash, chlorhexidine gel and LSO toothpaste at the end of a 5 day period, MS matter measured in the chlorhexidine gel group was significantly lower (*** p < 0.