chlordiazepoxide


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Related to chlordiazepoxide: chlordiazepoxide HCl

chlordiazepoxide

 [klor″di-a″ze-pok´sīd]
a benzodiazepine used as the base or hydrochloride salt in the treatment of anxiety disorders and short-term or preoperative anxiety, for alcohol withdrawal, and as an antitremor agent; administered orally, intravenously, or intramuscularly.

chlordiazepoxide

(klôr′dī-ăz′ə-pŏk′sīd′)
n.
A benzodiazepine drug, C16H14ClN3O, used in its hydrochloride form to treat anxiety disorders and alcohol withdrawal.

chlordiazepoxide

A class-V psychoactive benzodiazepine sedative, hypnotic, muscle relaxant and anticonvulsant, which depresses the limbic system.

Indications
Anxiety, anxiety disorders.
 
Adverse effects
Physical and psychologic dependence similar to barbiturates.

chlordiazepoxide

Neuropharmacology A psychoactive benzodiazepine sedative, hypnotic, muscle relaxant, anticonvulsant Effects Undetermined limbic CNS depressant effects Used for Anxiety, anxiety disorder Cons Physical and psychologic dependence similar to barbiturates. See the Little Yellow Pill.

chlordiazepoxide

A benzodiazepine sedative and tranquilizer. Millions are dependent on this and other benzodiazepine drugs and their addictive potential is well established. A brand name is Librium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore lorazepam was found to be significantly better than chlordiazepoxide in improving withdrawal symptoms.
This contrasts with our previous findings that flumazenil antagonized the effects of chlordiazepoxide administered acutely (Toal et al., 1991) or chronically (Leslie et al., 1994) on conditioned suppression.
Preliminary report of a trial of chlordiazepoxide. Br J Ophthalmol.
Toxicologist Dr Julie Evans said: "Fluoxetine and codeine were found at therapeutic levels whilst Chlordiazepoxide and amitriptyline were found at therapeutic levels.
Despite the patient initially receiving chlordiazepoxide for presumed alcohol withdrawal symptoms, we felt that the patient's presentation, short half-life of phenibut, and time course of our patient's substance abuse were more consistent with an acute phenibut withdrawal syndrome.
In addition, some drugs are used to treat the complications of ALD like antibiotics for infections; lactulose, rifaximin and L-ornithine L-aspartate (LOLA) for encephalopathy; furosemide and spironolactone for ascites and octreotide, propranolol and ethamsylate for variceal bleeding; disulfiram and naltrexone for decreasing the craving and dependence of alcohol; chlordiazepoxide for treating withdrawal symptoms.[11,12]
AWD usually begins within 3 days after abstinence and usually persists 2 or 3 days, but sometimes it can last from 1 to 8 days or more.[sup][4] The risk factors for AWD include prior episodes of alcohol withdrawal seizures or delirium, advanced age, comorbid conditions, detectable blood alcohol level on admission, high daily intake of alcohol, abnormal liver function, misuse of other depressant agents, and male sex.[sup][3] First line management of AWD is benzodiazepines (BZD) such as lorazepam, diazepam, and chlordiazepoxide.[sup][4] Other medications include phenobarbital, clomethiazole, midazolam, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, clonidine, dexmedetomidine, and propofol in BZD resistant case.[sup][3],[4]
([section]) Substances consistently reported to the surveillance system during study period: alprazolam, amphetamine, buprenorphine, cannabinoids, carisoprodol/ meprobamate, chlordiazepoxide, clonazepam, cocaine, codeine, diazepam, estazolam, ethanol, fentanyl, flunitrazepam, flurazepam, y-hydroxybutryric acid, helium, heroin, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, ketamine, lorazepam, meperidine, methadone, methamphetamine, midazolam, morphine, nitrous oxide, nordiazepam, oxazepam, oxycodone, oxymorphone, phencyclidine, temazepam, tramadol, triazolam, and zolpidem.
Drugs are often laced with chlordiazepoxide, phenazepam and promethazine - which numb the senses of users but which are deadly when mixed in high dosages.
Most common drugs prescribed among the patients were Anti-Depressants 75.33% (Fluoxetine, Imipramine and Sertraline), Anxiolytics 48.33% (Lorazepam, Clonazepam and Chlordiazepoxide), Anti-Psychotics 26% (Trifluoperazine, Chlorpromazine and Levosulpiride), Anticholinergics 17.16% and Antimanic/Mood Stabilizers 12.16%.
Researchers said the drugs - which include diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, and lorazepam - should be restricted to short-term use.
Anxious behavior lessened after researchers treated the crayfish with chlordiazepoxide, an anti-anxiety drug used in people.