chlordane


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hydrocarbon

 [hi″dro-kahr´bon]
an organic compound that contains carbon and hydrogen only.
alicyclic hydrocarbon one that has cyclic structure and aliphatic properties.
aliphatic hydrocarbon one in which no carbon atoms are joined to form a ring.
aromatic hydrocarbon one that has cyclic structure and a closed conjugated system of double bonds.
chlorinated hydrocarbon any hydrocarbon compound with chlorine substitutions; many are toxic. They are used mainly as refrigerants, industrial solvents, dry cleaning fluids, and insecticides (such as ddt and dieldrin). Some have been used as anesthetics, such as chloroform.

chlor·dane

(klōr'dān),
A chlorinated hydrocarbon used as an insecticide; it may be absorbed through the skin with resultant severe toxic effects: hyperexcitability of central nervous system, tremors, lack of muscular coordination, convulsions, and death; also causes damage to the liver, kidneys, and spleen. It is only mildly toxic to animals.

chlordane

/chlor·dane/ (klor´dān) a poisonous substance of the chlorinated hydrocarbon group, used as an insecticide.

chlordane

(klôr′dān′) also

chlordan

(-dăn′)
n.
A colorless, odorless, viscous liquid, C10H6Cl8, formerly used as an insecticide. It may be toxic to humans and wildlife as a result of its effect on the nervous system.
A viscous, chlorinated organic compound once used as an insecticide and fumigant, now limited by the EPA to control termites and non-food plants; it is absorbed through the skin, causes liver and kidney damage, and possibly cancer

chlordane

Toxicology A viscous, chlorinated organic compound once used as an insecticide and fumigant, now EPA-limited to control termites and non-food plants; it is absorbed through the skin, causes liver and kidney damage, possibly CA Clinical Convulsions, depression, hyperexcitability, incoordination, death

chlordane

References in periodicals archive ?
PCBs, mercury, and chlordane are legacy contaminants; that is, they have been responsible for contamination of fish tissue since monitoring began in specific regions such as the Great Lakes during the 1970s.
But these studies also suggested that most of the lindane, heptachlor, and many of the chlordanes detected in the air samples came from sources more than 60 miles away.
Low and high molecular weight PAHs and, to a lesser extent, chlordane had the highest loadings on PC3.
According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, almost every human on earth has chlordane in their fat and there is no way to get it out.
Especially in immature males, testis length diminished with increasing concentrations of many of these compounds, including DDT, polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants, and banned termiticides called chlordanes.
By 1861 Felton was listed as a 'wholesale druggist' selling Chlordane (a mixture of opium, morphine and chloroform) and 'Felton's Quinine Champagne'.
Other relatively minor contaminants that have been identified at MCRL sites in Ontario include the pesticides DDT, dieldrin, chlordane, and heptachlor (ESG, 1999a).
Some house and garden pesticides, such as dieldrin and chlordane, are now banned in many countries because they can damage children's nervous systems and contaminate the water supply.
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of The Host-Guest Complexation of a Commercial Chlordane Sample with Beta-Cylodextrin and Beta-Cyclodextrin Triacetate.
Fish tissue analysis indicated high concentrations of PCBs, mercury, DDT, dieldrin, chlordane and dioxins.
When still another female died, the New York State Wildlife Pathology Lab determined that both she and her eggs had accumulated enough of the pesticide chlordane in her tissues to cause her death.
In the book's first section, the authors explain the situation in the Arctic and the risks to human health arising from POPs (aldrin, chlordane, DDT, diel-drin, dioxins, endrin, furans, heptachlor, hexachlorobenzene, mirex, PCBs and toxaphene).