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chill

 [chil]
a sensation of cold, with convulsive shaking of the body. A true chill, or rigor, results from an increase in chemical activity within the body and usually ushers in a considerable rise in body temperature. The pallor and coldness of a chill, and the piloerection of the skin (goose flesh) that often accompanies it, are caused by constriction of the peripheral blood vessels. Chills are symptomatic of a wide variety of diseases. They usually do not accompany well-localized infections.
Patient Care. During a chill sufficient heat should be applied to maintain normal body temperature. Since the patient will most likely begin to have a sharp rise in body temperature immediately after or during the chill, it is best to use only a light blanket to alleviate the sensation of cold. In addition to this the patient's temperature should be taken every 30 minutes until it is stabilized.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

chill

(chĭl), Avoid the redundant phrase cold chill(s).
1. A sensation of cold.
2. A feeling of cold with shivering or shaking and pallor, accompanied by an elevation of temperature in the interior of the body; usually a symptom of an infectious disease due to the invasion of the blood by toxins. Synonym(s): rigor (2)
[A.S. cele, cold]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chill

(chĭl)
n.
1. A moderate but penetrating coldness.
2. A sensation of coldness, often accompanied by shivering and pallor of the skin.
v. chilled, chilling, chills
v.tr.
1. To affect with or as if with cold.
2. To lower in temperature; cool.

chill′ing·ly adv.
chill′ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

chill

Clinical medicine 1. A sensation of coldness often accompanied by shivering, chattering of teeth, goosebumps–gooseflesh, and skin pallor, which may follow exposure to a cold, damp environment, or precede or occur at the same time as a cold; chills are a response to an abrupt disparity between the set point of the hypothalamic thermostat and the blood temperature
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

chill

(chil)
1. A sensation of cold.
2. A feeling of cold with shivering and pallor, accompanied by an elevation of temperature in the interior of the body; usually a prodromal symptom of an infectious disease due to the presence in the blood of foreign protein or toxins.
Synonym(s): rigor (2) .
[A.S. cele, cold]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

chill

A sudden short fever causing shivering (rigor) and a feeling of coldness. This may be caused by any acute infection.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

chill

(chil)
A feeling of cold with shivering or shaking and pallor, accompanied by an elevation of temperature in the interior of the body; usually a symptom of an infectious disease.
[A.S. cele, cold]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The chilling sensitivity and decay susceptibility have been the subject of research throughout the world.
But there are reasons to doubt the chilling effect account.
They compared tenderness of fillets removed from carcasses immediately after chilling (0 hours aging) to fillets aged on carcasses for 150 minutes or 24 hours after chilling.
Ten samples were measured from each muscle type for each chilling temperature.
The purpose of this research was to determine whether continued metabolic activity or the increase in tissue volume accompanying radicle elongation caused loss of chilling tolerance.
Portable and central chilling systems from 0.5 to 200 tons.
For years, surgeons performing operations that may temporarily limit oxygen supplies to the brain have reduced the risk of surgery-related brain damage by chilling patients in advance--generally by placing them in a cooled room and by infusing them with chilled intravenous fluids.
Developed as an alternative to existing mechanical chilling systems, this new chilling solution has been tested though longevity trials at Heinrich Kuhlmann GmbH & Co KG, a leading producer of gourmet salads and other specialities.
Roach Foods approached worldwide freezing and chilling equipment specialist Starfrost.
Recommendation: The variation between chilled and unchilled mechanical properties tends to be greater in alloys that have long freezing ranges, such as A206, because chilling can be used to improve directional solidification and therefore feeding of the alloy.