child

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child

 [chīld]
the human young, from infancy to puberty.
child abuse the nonaccidental use of physical force or the nonaccidental act of omission by a parent or other custodian responsible for the care of a child. Child abuse encompasses malnutrition and other kinds of neglect through ignorance as well as deliberate withholding from the child of the necessary and basic physical care, including the medical and dental care necessary for the child to grow up without threat to his or her physical and emotional survival. Examples of physical abuse range from burns and exposure to extreme cold to beating, poisoning, strangulation, and withholding of food and water. Members of the health care team should be alert for signs of child abuse and aware of the proper procedure for reporting suspected cases to local authorities.

Abusive parents come from all socioeconomic groups. Many have themselves been abused as children. They typically lack parenting skills and do not understand the normal developmental stages through which children progress and demand performance from their children that is clearly beyond a child's capability. Some engage in role reversal, looking to the child for protection and loving response, while at the same time denying the child satisfaction of his or her own needs. The majority of identified abusive parents are believed to want professional help in changing their behavior.
abused child/adult in the omaha system, a client problem in the psychosocial domain, defined as a child or adult subjected to nonaccidental physical or emotional injury.
autistic child a child suffering from autistic disorder.
exceptional child a child with special learning needs; he or she may have learning disabilities, be handicapped, or be gifted.
neglected child/adult in the omaha system, a client problem in the psychosocial domain, defined as a child or adult deprived of minimally accepted standards of food, shelter, clothing, and care.

CHILD

Acronym for congenital hemidysplasia with ichthyosiform erythroderma and limb defects.
Synonym(s): CHILD syndrome

child

(chīld)
n. pl. children (chĭl′drən)
1.
a. A person between birth and puberty.
b. A person who has not attained maturity or the age of legal majority.
2.
a. An unborn infant; a fetus.
b. An infant; a baby.
3. A son or daughter; an offspring.

child′less adj.
child′less·ness n.

child

Etymology: AS, cild
1 a person of either sex between the time of birth and adolescence.
2 an unborn or recently born human being; fetus; neonate; infant.
3 an offspring or descendant; a son or daughter or a member of a particular tribe or clan.
4 one who is like a child or immature.
Legal definition A person who has not attained the legal age for consent to treatment or procedures involved in research, as determined under the applicable law of the jurisdiction in which the research will be conducted

child

A person who has not attained the legal age for consent to treatment or procedures involved in the research, as determined under the applicable law of the jurisdiction in which the research will be conducted Medtalk Pediatric patient. See Adopted-in child, Adopted-away child, Battered child, Chosen child, FLK, Latchkey child, Puppet child, Wednesday's child, The Wild Child.

child,

n 1. a person of either gender between the time of birth and adolescence, or puberty.
2. in the law of negligence and in laws for the protection of children, a term used as the opposite of
adult (generally under the age of puberty) without reference to parentage and distinction of gender.
child abuse,
n the physical, sexual, or emotional maltreatment of a person under 18 years of age. Child abuse occurs predominantly with children under 3 years of age. Symptoms include bruises and contusions, medical record of repeated trauma, radiographic evidence of fractures, emotional distress, and failure to thrive.
child neglect,
n a form of child abuse in which proper care is denied or withheld.

Patient discussion about child

Q. Could be – Arthritis in children?!? My son started to show symptoms similar to arthritis. But I know it’s a common disease in the elderly population. Could be arthritis in children?

A. You baffled me, I never thought about this idea before…children’s arthritis. So I looked up for information in the best site I know for pediatric care and here is what I found:
http://www.drmdk.com/html/ped_rheumatology.html

Q. Can cancer occur in young children? I heard that cancer happens more often as you get older. Can it happen to kids as well?

A. Cancer can happen in children, but the age of peak incidence of cancer in children occurs during the first year of life, in infants. The average annual incidence in the United States, 1975-1995, was 233 per million infants. Several estimates of incidence exist. In the U.S: Neuroblastoma comprised 28% of infant cancer cases and was the most common malignancy among these young children. The leukemias as a group represented the next most common type of cancer, comprising 17% of all cases.

Q. Is it ok not to want children? I am 33, and I know my bio clock is ticking, but I just don't want to have a child. At least not yet. Is there something wrong with me?

A. I agree with fatman, that's totally your decision.
If you feel that you're not ready yet, better to wait until you're more ready for that. Because having children is another big responsibility, and you will feel guilty if -for the sake of your age- you push yourself to have child, then morally you are not welcoming that child.

More discussions about child
References in periodicals archive ?
It will be essential to examine the effect of childlessness bias within and across racial groups, disabilities, and sexual orientations.
2015, <<Fifty Shades of Freedom: Voluntary Childlessness as Women's Ultimate Liberation>>, Women's Studies International Forum, 53: 182-191.
Changes in family structure in the industrialised and post-industrialised world involve unstable marriages, higher union dissolution rates, postponement of childbearing, rising trends of childlessness, and declining fertility.
Couples who claimed no such experience attributed it to the tremendous amount of love and understanding between them, some said their childlessness did not bother them.
Maximova K and Quesnel-Vallee A, Mental health consequences of unintended childlessness and unplanned births: gender differences and life course dynamics, Social Science & Medicine, 2009, 68(5):850-857.
California does have a higher rate of childlessness, but the reasons are hard to pin down," said Hans Johnson, the report's author, noting that the state generally offers higher wages, and women might be more likely to focus on their careers because of that.
Census fertility data are also critical for the examination of lifetime fertility and childlessness.
Gender comparisons were made with respect to sexual morality involving pre-marital sex, extra-marital sex, and childlessness.
One out of five couples deals with the challenges of infertility and childlessness.
2) Research in the Reproductive Medicine Unit in Cape Town has defined and emphasised the impact of involuntary childlessness on South African couples and certainly provides compelling evidence for addressing the need for access to suitable therapy.
Until couples abandon treatment, they often do not see their biological childlessness as permanent (Greil, 1991).
It hits me as so personal--a test of my childlessness, a residual of those long-ago miscarriages, the abortion.