childbed


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childbed

(chīld′bĕd′)
n.
The condition of a woman in the process of giving birth.
Referring to the postpartum or puerperal period

childbed

Historically, the period of parturition during which women remained in bed for labor, delivery, and the traditional 6 weeks' recovery time after childbirth. Synonym: puerperium See: childbed fever
References in periodicals archive ?
But why are the pre-baptismal child and its mother described as 'Muslims' in childbed, rather than, say, 'pagan'?
Another early source is a note in the manuscripts of the College of Heralds, written on 12 November, which states simply that she had died in childbed.
Studies in the history of probability and statistics: Semmelweis and childbed fever.
Louis Schwartz's Milton and Maternal Mortality, a study of John Milton's poetic exploration of the material, cultural, and gendered dimensions of childbed in the early modern period, carefully reads both the major and minor poems to reveal how "Milton struggled to identify the proper theological function of the suffering many women experienced in childbirth" (4).
The contagiousness of childbed fever": a short history of puerperal sepsis and its treatment.
The treatise I here present you with contains a Description of all the indispositions of women with child and in childbed, with the art of well practising midwifery and nursing.
For Holies the tragedy was even more intense because of the "parallel she [his wife] made to my mother; my mother brought my father three children as she did unto me; my mother died in childbed of a daughter as she did; the daughter died likewise as hers did; my son was within about six weeks as old as I was at the departure of my mother" (231).
In 1847, at the age of 28, the Viennese obstetrician Ignac Semmelweis famously deduced that by not washing hands, doctors were themselves to blame for childbed fever, also known as puerperal fever.
Marguerite's diplomacy from her childbed in Damietta was crucial to the terms of her crusading husband's release from captivity.
Childbed rituals functioned to give women in the early modern period, and beyond, opportunities to transgress the bounds of normally accepted female behaviour, and as such were domains of potential deviance thought to require male regulation and suppression.