childbed


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childbed

(chīld′bĕd′)
n.
The condition of a woman in the process of giving birth.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Referring to the postpartum or puerperal period
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

childbed

Historically, the period of parturition during which women remained in bed for labor, delivery, and the traditional 6 weeks' recovery time after childbirth. Synonym: puerperium See: childbed fever
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Musser and his team particlularly studied the M28 strain of group A streptococcus, which is said to be causing invasive cases of infection and childbed fever.
Speakers referred to this period by the Amharic term aras bet, which can be glossed as 'childbed' (9) and connotes the forty- or eighty-day postpartum seclusion of the woman and her baby prior to its baptism.
Several versions mention the provision of a 'caudle', which the Oxford English Dictionary describes as a warm drink consisting of thin gruel, mixed with wine or ale, sweetened and spiced, and given especially to women in childbed.
(14) At the moment of her mother's death, Sophie becomes exceedingly important to her father: "His [Colonel Sternheim's] wife had presented him with a daughter, who grew up very prettily and--as Sternheim had the misfortune of losing her mother in childbed together with a newborn son--she was from her ninth year her father's consolation and his sole joy on earth" (70).
Ignaz Semmelweis, a 19th-century Hungarian obstetrician, discovered empirically that by washing his hands between patients, he could sharply cut the number of deaths from childbed fever (Wikipedia 2012).
During this time in history, puerperal fever (post partum [PP] infection) or "childbed fever" boasted a death rate as high as 16% to 35%.
During childbirth, my grandmother contracted puerperal, or childbed, fever, which almost killed her.
Almost two hundred years ago Ignaz Semmelweis, the Hungarian physician realised that 'childbed fever' could be drastically reduced if care-givers washed their hands appropriately.
In Aldhelm's riddle, despite the use of the term "puerpera" (8, "a woman in labor or in childbed, a lying-in woman"), the sexual connotations are clearly enhanced by the choice of expressions such as "gremium pandens" (8), alluding to the girl's deliberate visual display of her physical charms.
the term gyermekagysegely (gyermekagy = childbed, segely = benefit) (1891) is changed to gyermekagyi segely (confinement benefit) (1907) by analogy with the qualificative two-word terms meaning other benefits.