baby talk

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Related to child-directed speech: motherese

baby talk

1 the speech patterns and sounds of young children learning to talk, characterized by mispronunciation, imperfect syntax, repetition, and phonetic modifications, such as lisping or stuttering. See also lallation.
2 the intentionally oversimplified manner of speech, imitative of young children learning to talk, used by adults in addressing children or pets.
3 the speech patterns characteristic of regressive stages of various mental disorders, especially schizophrenia.
The acquisition of language skills by a baby, which occurs in 5 overlapping stages
(1) phonation—humming with the mouth closed (up to 2 months)
(2) primitive articulation—use of tongue and jaw to form new sounds (1 to 4 months)
(3) expansion—squeals, screeches, whispers, seemingly exploring the range of sounds, pitch, and amplitude—e.g., growls, ‘raspberries’ (3 to 8 months)

(4) babbling—the formation of Baby’s first syllables—da-da-da-da, ma-ma-ma-ma, etc. (5 to 10 months)

(5) sophisticated babbling—the stringing together of various syllables and meaningless sounds which have the rhythm and pacing of real sentences (9 to 18 months)
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References in periodicals archive ?
The total of the 8,084 Catalan child-directed speech utterances obtained from the corpus preparation were analyzed in terms of length and lexical complexity.
Furthermore, a type/token ratio of all the very short utterances was worked out in order to check the degree of lexical variety found in Catalan child-directed speech.
Besides utterance length, the lexical complexity of very short utterances in Catalan child-directed speech was also analyzed.
Words in Catalan have considerable chance of being found in isolation in child-directed speech.
Therefore, an analysis of all one-word utterances found in the Catalan corpus was also conducted, in order to test exactly which parts of speech are most commonly found in isolation, and thus, to see whether the facilitation effects provided by child-directed speech would be equally balanced across all grammatical categories.
Therefore, children can benefit from the facilitation effects of child-directed speech for the segmentation of open-class words only.
Given the evidence provided by the data presented in this study, the conclusion can be drawn that utterances in Catalan child-directed speech are predominantly short and lexically redundant, with a very high degree of lexical overlap from utterance to utterance.
However, although the facilitation effects provided by child-directed speech cannot be denied, a complete account of the word-segmentation problem as a whole cannot be based just on the properties of the environmental linguistic input.
To solve that problem, the kind of very short utterances found in child-directed speech only offer a partial solution.
Furthermore, the assumption that the answer to the word-segmentation problem as a whole lies in the information available in child-directed speech places the burden of the task on the speakers generating the child's language input.