child maltreatment


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child maltreatment

'…intentional harm or threat of harm to a child by someone acting in the role of a caretaker, for even a short time…Categories Physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, neglect…', the last being most common. See Child abuse, Child abuser.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prinz reported that the number of child maltreatment cases was 17.
Child maltreatment is recognized as a major public health concern by the World Health Organization (WHO).
Child maltreatment risk factors, such as those discussed previously, often co-occur within families.
Cluster 1--Conditions Necessary for and Effects of Child Maltreatment was the only other concept that was rated above 6.
Associations between voluntary and involuntary forms of perinatal loss and child maltreatment among low income, single mothers.
It is also due to child maltreatment moving beyond 'the battered baby syndrome' to include neglect, physical, sexual and emotional abuse, and risk of, or potential for harm.
Colorado Springs staff found that workers in the domestic violence program were not always screening new cases for child maltreatment, and the child welfare agency was not adequately screening for domestic abuse.
A substantial amount of research in the area of child maltreatment has been generated within the past 20 years.
A key component of DCIPFV is advocates, specially trained in the areas of domestic violence and child protection, who approach mothers either through the Department of Children and Families child protective investigators during the child maltreatment investigation or directly through the dependency court to inquire about their safety and offer confidential services.
Convened by the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, the summit is designed to provide battered women's advocates, child protective workers, and administrators, judges and court personnel with an opportunity to explore new, integrated approaches to assisting families facing both child maltreatment and domestic violence.
Critics of the current response system say that too often several different courts and social service agencies offer a disjointed and ineffective set of interventions and treat adult domestic violence and child maltreatment as unrelated phenomena.
Embeddedness of child-rearing in kin and community acts against the social isolation that has been linked with child maltreatment.

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