mite

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Related to chigger mite: harvest mite, Scabies mite

mite

 [mīt]
any arthropod of the order Acarina except the ticks; they are characterized by minute size, usually transparent or semitransparent body, and other features distinguishing them from the ticks. They may be free living or parasitic on animals or plants, and may produce various irritations of the skin.
chigger mite (harvest mite) chigger.
itch mite (mange mite) Sarcoptes scabiei.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mite

(mīt),
A minute arthropod of the order Acarina, a vast assemblage of parasitic and (primarily) free-living organisms. Most are still undescribed, and only a relatively small number are of medical or veterinary importance as vectors or intermediate hosts of pathogenic agents, by directly causing dermatitis or tissue damage, or by causing blood or tissue fluid loss. The six-legged larvae of trombiculid mites, the chigger mites (Trombicula), are parasitic of humans and many mammals and birds; they are important as vectors of scrub typhus (tsutsugamushi disease) and other rickettsial agents. Some other important mites are Acarus hordei (barley mite), Demodex folliculorum (follicular or mange mite), Dermanyssus gallinae (red hen mite), Ornithonyssus bacoti (tropical rat mite), Ornithonyssus bursa (tropical fowl mite), Ornithonyssus sylviarum (northern fowl mite), Pyemotes tritici (straw or grain itch mite), and Sarcoptes scabiei (itch mite).
[A.S.]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mite

(mīt)
n.
Any of numerous small or minute arachnids of the order Acarina, including species that damage crops or stored food and species that are parasitic on animals and often transmit disease.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mite

any member of the order Acarina, ARACHNIDS possessing clawed appendages in front of the mouth (chelicarae). They may be free-living (many thousands/m2 in soil) or parasitic.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Mite

An insect parasite belonging to the order Acarina. The organism that causes scabies is a mite.
Mentioned in: Scabies
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most ecological and histological studies deal with chigger mites on frogs infested by the mite genus Hannemania, thus we took this genus as a reference organism for our study of E.
To date, we found individuals of 34 anuran species (Table 1) in the national park (Rodel, 1996) and checked them for the occurrence of small red excrescences which indicate infestation by chigger mites. We captured frogs with a net or by hand from 1991-1995.
Only one individual of another species, the toad Bufo maculatus (Hallowell, 1854), showed, on its ventral side, 14 red excrescences caused by intradermal chigger mites. We could not determine whether this parasite was E.
stejnegeri males), snout-vent length (SVL, to the nearest 0.1 mm), weight (W) measured to the nearest 0.1 g with a 30-g Pesola[TM] spring scale, and total number of chigger mites carried ([T.sub.m]).
Ewing (1944) was the first to determine that there are two families of chigger mites (Trombiculidae and Leeuwenhoekiidae) under the superfamily Trombiculidae Ewing (Li et al.
The specimens of two new species of chigger mites were collected from two species of rodents (order Rodentia) the Yunnan red-backed vole (also called the Yunnan Chinese vole or the large oriental vole) Eothenomys miletus (Thomas 1914) (Andrew and Xie 2009) in the family Cricetidae and the sladeni rat Rattus sladeni (Linnaeus 1758) in the family Muridae.
The chigger mites on the rodents were conventionally collected (Li et al.