chief

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chief

adjective Principal, main, see Chief complaint. noun
1. Chief of service, see there.
2. Chief of staff, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"My research took decades to compile and unequivocally confirms the chiefship claim.
There have been conflicting interpretations of chiefship between, on the one hand, those who view it as an embodiment of traditional values and, on the other hand, those who regard it as a parasitic institution which serves mainly as an organ for the exploitation and impoverishment of the rural population.
The next eight contributions discuss gender agency and social networks, specifically addressing the formation of the women's movement; gender and chiefship in Southern Africa; gender, ethnicity, and job expectations on an automobile factory assembly line; and gender experiences in academic institutions, among other topics.
The "rule" was that the son of the great-house would inherit the chiefship, but this was not always the case.
Packard, Chiefship and Cosmology: An Historical Study of Political Competition (Bloomington, 1981), p.
The Hwata chiefdom is in some dispute, both as to who should properly succeed to the chiefship, and whether the physical chiefdom should be located in Chiweshe Communal Area or in Muzarabani Communal Area, far to the north in the Zambezi Valley.
(2013) Dealing with Government in South Sudan: history of chiefship, community and state.
24 and 25) when predicating chiefship of a particular individual.
British forms of sociability intersected with classic Ganda ideas of chiefship, hospitality, and performance of authority, though not always in predictable ways.
Thus, when the counter-revolutionary movement RENAMO gained ground, its supporters favoured the cultural institutions, especially chiefship, that had regulated their lives for so long (p.
Hope was killed at the hands of Mhlontlo and Mditsha, the Mpondomise leader of Tsolo.(55) Colonial retribution involved the confiscation of substantial lands, the introduction of a range of policies and practices such as tax collection that insinuated the state into the most intimate domains of the household, but also the destruction of Mpondomise chiefship. As elsewhere in the Eastern Cape, state-appointed headmen became the most important holders of political office.
One revealing case was associated with a long-running border dispute between the Luac Dinka under the chiefship of Mayen Tuc in Tonj District and the Agar Pakkam Dinka under Wol Athiaq of Rumbek District.