horse chestnut

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Related to chestnut: American chestnut
A deciduous tree, the bark or fruit of which contains coumarins, flavonoids, saponins, tannins; it is believed to be anti-inflammatory; it is administered as an extract or decoction for arthritis, haemorrhoids, varicose veins, and to stimulate circulation; it is used topically for muscle pain and cramps
Toxicity HCs are poisonous, and may be fatal in children
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

horse chest·nut

(hōrs chest'nŭt)
(Aesculus hippocastanum) The nuts from this tree, after preparation, are made into a liquid used for its purported value as a tonic and narcotic.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
A waft of wind came sweeping down the laurel-walk, and trembled through the boughs of the chestnut: it wandered away--away--to an indefinite distance--it died.
They descended, passing the man with the pail, who again asseverated that he had let no intruder pass, down to the commissionaire and the hovering chestnut man, who rigidly reasserted their own watchfulness.
As the car swept round the crescent it passed, at one corner, the stray stall of a man selling chestnuts; and right away at the other end of the curve, Angus could see a dim blue policeman walking slowly.
Not content with this, he captured the floating policeman and induced him to stand opposite the entrance and watch it; and finally paused an instant for a pennyworth of chestnuts, and an inquiry as to the probable length of the merchant's stay in the neighbourhood.
"Keep yourself warm on your own chestnuts," he said earnestly.
And, indeed, as he spoke, the first few flakes, foreseen by the man of chestnuts, began to drift across the darkening windowpane.
Up the avenue Margaret strolled slowly, stopping to watch the sky that gleamed through the upper branches of the chestnuts, or to finger the little horseshoes on the lower branches.
and as if scorning to say more to the frightened and shamefaced count, he lashed the heaving flanks of his sweating chestnut gelding with all the anger the count had aroused and flew off after the hounds.
It was not long, however, before the restless savages were heard beating the brush, and gradually approaching the inner edge of that dense border of young chestnuts which encircled the little area.
He was really beautiful, with the contentment of his face, straight as the trunk of a chestnut, his old velvet coat thrown back, his shirt of coarse cloth open at the breast, so that one saw the play of the ribs.