Flint

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Related to chert: Dolostone, micrite

Flint

(flint),
Austin, U.S. physician, 1812-1886. See: Austin Flint murmur, Flint murmur, Austin Flint phenomenon.

Flint

(flint),
Austin, Jr., U.S. physiologist, 1836-1915. See: Flint arcade.

silica

Homeopathy
Silica, see there.

Toxicology
The highly fibrogenic mineral form of silicon, silicon dioxide.

Silica

Homeopathy
A homeopathic remedy prepared from quartz, which is used to stimulate the immune system and to treat abscesses, acne, athlete’s foot, breast cysts, earache, fractures, haemorrhoids, infections (colds, flu and otitis), insomnia, lymphadenopathy, periodontal disease, poor bone growth and sweating.
References in periodicals archive ?
No Amerindian ceramics and a single chert flake were found.
I replaced the commercial flint in my .50-caliber Thompson/Center Hawken flintlock with part of one of Sam's chert points, then used this hybridized tool to take a fine doe.
XRF data show that the major component of the shell was silica (>90 wt%), at higher concentration than in the surrounding rocks (<60 wt% in the black shales and <90 wt% in the green chert) (Table 1).
Oxygen isotope measurements on glass and chert samples were carried out according to well-established techniques.
Two periods of searing-hot hydrothermal activity had cooked both the seafloor cherts and the surface glacial sediments.
Among the stone types, only barnbal (dolerite) and garttamalga (chert) were identified as being sought out as raw material sources for stone tools.
Debitage: The C1 debitage assemblage contains 1152 items and is dominated in numbers by flake fragments and secondary retouch flakes of chert and chalcedony (Table 6).
In the case of the ex-situe oil shale mining; the oil shale in the study area froms from the Muwaqqar (Chalk Marl) Formation; This Formation is composed of marl, chalky limestone, micritic limestone and chert and overlaid the main aquifer in the study area.
The work begins with three essays on comparative studies in Mayan stone tool use and follows with a selection of research on the usage of specific stone types including chert, obsidian, and jade.
The Lost River Chert Bed is found above the Goodes Cave entrance in a sequence of sublithographic and micritic limestone beds bearing brachiopods and fenestrate bryzoas.
The nature of chert exposures in the Passismanua area of West New Britain, Papua New Guinea is reviewed in light of reports of worked seams of chert in five caves.