drug

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Related to chemotherapeutic drug: Antineoplastic agents

drug

(drŭg),
1. Therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease. For types or classifications of drugs, see the specific name.
See also: agent.
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying an overly large quantity or a narcotic.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, that can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.
[M.E. drogge]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

drug

(drŭg)
n.
1.
a. A substance used in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of a disease or as a component of a medication.
b. Such a substance as recognized or defined by the US Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.
2. A chemical substance, such as a narcotic or hallucinogen, that affects the central nervous system, causing changes in behavior and often addiction.
tr.v. drugged, drugging, drugs
a. To administer a drug to, especially to treat pain or induce anesthesia.
b. To give a drug to, especially surreptitiously, in order to induce stupor.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

drug

(1) An article other than food that is intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease, or is intended to affect the structure or any function of the body. The term does not include a device, or a component, part or accessory of a device.
(2) A substance recognised by an official pharmacopia or formulary.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

drug

NIHspeak Any chemical compound that may be used on or administered to humans to help diagnose, treat, cure, mitigate, or prevent disease or other abnormal conditions Regulatory definition An article or substance that is
1. Recognized by the US Pharmacopoeia, National Formulary, or official Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia, or supplement to any of the above.
2. Intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease in man or animals.
3. Intended to affect the structure or any function of the body of man or animals Substance abuse Any medication; the word drug also carries a negative connotation–implying abuse, addiction, or illicit use. See Alternative drug, Antithyroid drug, Antituberculosis drug, Blockbuster drug, Brake drug, Butterfly drug, Category X drug, Cholesterol-lowering drug, Club drug, Club of Rome drug, Crude drug, Designer drug, Disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, Door-to-drug, Free drug, Gateway drug, Generic drug, Group C drug, Hard drug, Immunomodulatory drug, INAD drug, Investigational drug, Legend drug, Me too drug, Lifestyle drug, Narrow therapeutic index drug, Natural drug, New drug, Non-legend drug, Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, Oligonucleotide drug, Orphan drug, Over-the-counter drug, Overseas mail-order drug, Performance enhancing drug, Pocket drug, Prescription drug, Probe drug, Prodrug, Pseudo-orphan drug, Psychoactive drug, Radioactive drug, Radiomimetic drug, Recreational drug, Second-line drug, Selective cytokine inhibitory drug, Soft drug, Treatment-investigational new drug, Wonder drug.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

drug

(drŭg)
1. A therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease.
See also: agent, medication
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying that an excessive quantity or a narcotic is involved.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, that can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

drug

1. Any substance used as medication or for the diagnosis of disease.
2. A popular term for any narcotic or addictive substance.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

drug

  1. any substance used as an ingredient in medical preparations.
  2. any substance that affects the normal body functions.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

drug

(drŭg)
1. Therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease.
See also: agent
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying an overly large quantity or a narcotic.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, which can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about drug

Q. is it ok to use drugs for medical reasons? and who is to decide when is necessary to use drugs when needed?

A. Today the most used "medical" drugs are narcotics- for pain relief, for patients who suffer extreme pain. All sorts of Codaine and Morphine types are used and on a very wide basis, and they are specially perscribed for ones who need them.

Q. How about Psychiatric Drugs for bipolar? One of my friend is suffering from bipolar. Will Psychiatric medications help him to come out of this affect?

A. from what i read- there are certain medication that can help. if the first one doesn't - there is a second and third line of medication. from a personal experience (not mine, a friend of the family) it can even save your friend's life..

Q. What medications are forbidden to take with alcohol? And why is that?

A. I think this web page will give you something to think about:
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa27.htm
apparently there are more drugs you shouldn’t mix with alcohol then I could think of…

More discussions about drug
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References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, we demonstrated that MG-63/DOX subline was also cross-resistant to other conventional chemotherapeutic drugs (Table 1).
The study further evaluated the synergistic effects of extracts from the two plants with 5-Fluorouracil, an antimetabolite and anti-cancer chemotherapeutic drug that is widely used in the treatment of colon, prostate, breast cancer.A number of side effects have been observed in the usage of the drug alone including hair loss, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and diarrhea but when it was given with a combination of the two extracts, no side effects were observed.
Elliotts B Solution (buffered intrathecal electrolyte/dextrose injection) is a diluent for methotrexate sodium, a chemotherapeutic drug and immune system suppressant, and cytarabine, a chemotherapeutic drug.
The combination of anti-metabolites with a chemotherapeutic drug can produce a broad spectrum of synergistic effects, depending on the drug administration schedule and concentration (Bokkerink et al.
for transdermal delivery of a chemotherapeutic drug where the drug is administered through the skin.
The Faulk technology employs chemical conjugation techniques to create powerful pairings of proteins and chemotherapeutic drug formulations that provide a targeting strategy and the predictable delivery of a therapeutic drug.
Firstly, scalp cooling causes blood vessel vasoconstriction, which dramatically reduces blood flow to the scalp and it has been suggested that less chemotherapeutic drug is delivered to the hair follicles.
The team then employed a high-density tumor microenvironment in which colon cancer cells were co-cultured with stromal cells and treated with varying concentrations of BCM-95[R] curcumin and/or the chemotherapeutic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU).
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued an alert about three patients who have reported they feel intoxicated after taking in docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic drug.
They discuss progress in China in cancer biotherapy and chemotherapeutic drug research; cancer targeting gene-viro-therapy; the relationship between antiproliferative activities and class I MHC surface expression of mouse interferon proteins on B16-F10 melanoma cells; mitotic regulator Hec1 as a potential target for cancer therapy; advances in liposome-based targeted gene therapy; rewiring the intracellular signaling network in cancer; and the research and development of highly potent antibody-based drug conjugates and fusion proteins for cancer therapy.
Compared with proliferating lymphocytes, a 500-fold higher concentration of chemotherapeutic drug is required to kill resting cells (12).
At Qatar Health 2010 for the first time a Basic Science track is offered and the major themes this year include Resuscitation Science and Peritoneal Chemotherapeutic Drug Delivery in Pelvic-abdominal Cancers.