chemosurgery


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Related to chemosurgery: Mohs technique

chemosurgery

 [ke″mo-ser´jer-e]
the removal of diseased tissue after first chemically treating it.

che·mo·sur·ger·y

(kē'mō-ser'jer-ē),
Excision of diseased tissue after it has been fixed in situ by chemical means.

chemosurgery

(kē′mō-sûr′jə-rē, kĕm′ō-)
n.
Selective destruction of tissue by use of chemicals, as for removing malignant skin lesions.

che′mo·sur′gi·cal (-jĭ-kəl) adj.

chemosurgery

Mohs' micrographic technique Plastic surgery A technique for excising superficial, locally invasive, tumor microfingerlets of primary, nonmelanoma skin CA, yielding a cure rate of > 98% for broad, superficial skin CAs, best for > 1-2 cm recurrent tumors, recurrence-prone sites–nose, eyes, ears, aggressive histologic subtypes–eg, morphea-like or metatypical BCC. See Basal cell carcinoma. Cf Chemical peel.

che·mo·sur·ger·y

(kē'mō-sŭr'jĕr-ē)
Excision of diseased tissue after it has been fixed in situ by chemical means.

chemosurgery

The use of chemicals to destroy unwanted tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of Ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) is rapidly gaining popularity as the mainstay disease intervention and has completely transformed the treatment and prognosis of retinoblastoma since its introduction.11 In the span of the last decade, the treatment algorithms of retinoblastoma management, and even its classification has seen a complete overhaul due to the dramatic results produced by OAC and intravitreal chemotherapy.
Ten-year experience with ophthalmic artery chemosurgery: Ocular and recurrence-free survival.
Ophthalmic artery chemosurgery for eyes with advanced retinoblastoma.
Ghosh, "Chemosurgery for basal cell carcinoma," The Journal of the American Medical Association, vol.
Becker, "Secondary healing after Mohs chemosurgery," Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, vol.
Many researchers who have compared multiple modalities (i.e., radiotherapy, electrodesiccation and curettage, Mohs' surgery, and surgical excision) have found that surgical excision and Mohs' chemosurgery offer the best cure rates.
Lesions in these areas have long been difficult to remove by surgical excision and Mohs' chemosurgery because of the potential for causing cosmetic deformity or functional disability.