chemosensory disorder

chemosensory dysfunction

A defect of smell and/or taste—complaints of loss of taste usually reflect a loss of smell.
 
Aetiology
Head trauma, upper respiratory tract infection, chronic nasal and paranasal sinus disease; psychological depression and thyroid dysfunction are associated with CD; oestrogens ameliorate the CD seen in postmenopausal patients. A specific type of CD, the burning mouth syndrome, is associated with extreme weight loss.

chemosensory disorder

Any disorder of smell or taste, e.g., anosmia or ageusia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The extent of a chemosensory disorder can be determined by measuring the lowest concentration of a chemical that a person can detect or recognize.
Some people are born with chemosensory disorders, but most develop them after an injury or illness.
Chemosensory disorders may result from polyps in the nasal cavities, sinus infections, hormonal disturbances, or dental problems.
For more on treating chemosensory disorders, consider neurologist Alan R.
In a study of 750 consecutive patients with chemosensory disorders seen at the University of Pennsylvania's Smell and Taste Center, only two cases (0.3%) were induced by brain tumors.
Of the more than 10 million Americans estimated in one study to have chemosensory disorders, "the predominant problem is a natural decline in smell ability that typically occurs after age 60," according to NIDCD.
Consider directing your clinical acumen to help patients, community members, and future generations "come to their chemosenses." Those readers interested in an in-depth clinical discussion and a detailed analysis of the neuroscience may wish to refer to "Chemosensory Disorders: Emerging Roles in Food Selection, Nutrient Inadequacies, and Digestive Dysfunction." This is a chapter authored by Alan Hirsch, MD, and Bradley Whitman, MD, MS, in Advancing Medicine with Food and Nutrients, Second Edition (CRC Press 2012).
The conditions include all those you might expect - dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, hypertension, asthma, ADHD, autism, diabetes, obesity, acne, irritable bowel, depression, Parkinson's - and quite a few that you might not (chemosensory disorders, rhinosinusitis, seizures, and renal calculi).
* Chemosensory disorders: diminished taste and smell acquired from medical and iatrogenic causes unfavorably alter food selection.