chemoreceptor

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chemoreceptor

 [ke″mo-re-sep´ter]
any of the special cells or organs adapted for excitation by chemical substances and located outside the central nervous system. The carotid and aortic bodies are chemoreceptors in the large arteries of the thorax and the neck; they are responsive to changes in the oxygen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen ion concentrations in the blood. When oxygen concentration falls below normal in the arterial blood, they send impulses to stimulate the respiratory center so that there will be an increase in alveolar ventilation and thus an increase in the intake of oxygen by the lungs. Other chemoreceptors are the taste buds, which are sensitive to chemicals in the mouth, and the olfactory cells of the nose, which detect certain chemicals in the air.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

che·mo·re·cep·tor

(kē'mō-rē-sep'tŏr),
Any cell that when activated by a change in its chemical milieu produces a nerve impulse. Such cells can be either 1) "transducer" cells innervated by sensory nerve fibers (for example, the gustatory receptor cells of the taste buds or cells in the carotid body sensitive to changes in the oxygen and carbon dioxide content of the blood), or 2) nerve cells proper, such as the olfactory receptor cells of the olfactory mucosa, and certain cells in the brainstem that are sensitive to changes in the composition of the blood or cerebrospinal fluid.
Synonym(s): chemoceptor
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chemoreceptor

(kē′mō-rĭ-sĕp′tər, kĕm′ō-)
n.
A sensory nerve cell or sense organ, as of smell or taste, that responds to chemical stimuli.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

che·mo·re·cep·tor

, chemoceptor (kē'mō-rĕ-sep'tŏr, kēmō-septŏr)
Any cell that responds to a change in its chemical milieu with a nerve impulse. Such cells can be either "transducer" cells innervated by sensory nerve fibers (e.g., the gustatory cells of the taste buds) or nerve cells proper, such as the olfactory receptor cells of the olfactory mucosa.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

chemoreceptor

a RECEPTOR that is stimulated by contact with molecules and is capable of reacting to and differentiating between different chemical stimuli. Chemoreceptors are found where external stimuli are being sampled, for example in the taste buds and in the mucous membranes of the nose. They are also found within the body, sampling the internal environment.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

che·mo·re·cep·tor

, chemoceptor (kē'mō-rĕ-sep'tŏr, kēmō-septŏr)
Any cell that responds to a change in its chemical milieu with a nerve impulse.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012