chemodectoma


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chemodectoma

 [ke″mo-dek-to´mah]
any benign, chromaffin-negative tumor of the chemoreceptor system, such as a tumor of the carotid, aortic, or tympanic body.

che·mo·dec·to·ma

(kē'mō-dek-tō'mă),
Aortic body, carotid body, chemoreceptor, or glomus jugulare tumor; nonchromaffin paraganglioma; receptoma; a relatively rare, usually benign neoplasm originating in the chemoreceptor tissue of the carotid body, glomus jugulare, and aortic bodies; consisting histologically of rounded or ovoid hyperchromatic cells that tend to be grouped in an alveoluslike pattern within a scant to moderate amount of fibrous stroma and a few large thin-walled vascular channels. Compare: paraganglioma.
[chemo- + G. dektēs, receiver, fr. dechomai, to receive, + -oma, tumor]

chemodectoma

(1) Paraganglioma. 
(2) Carotid body tumour, see there.

che·mo·dec·to·ma

(kē'mō-dek-tō'mă)
A relatively rare, usually benign neoplasm originating in the chemoreceptor tissue of the carotid body, glomus jugulare, and aortic bodies.
Compare: paraganglioma
Synonym(s): glomus jugulare tumor.
[chemo- + G. dektēs, receiver, fr. dechomai, to receive, + -oma, tumor]
References in periodicals archive ?
Hanna, "Chemodectoma involving the cavernous sinus and semilunar ganglion," Human Pathology, vol.
These markers can be used to distinguish mesotheliomas from adenocarcinomas, which do not express vimentin, and chemodectomas, which do not express vimentin or cytokeratins.
Garcin's syndrome in a patient with a malignant chemodectoma of the neck.
This report probably represents the first cases of IHC-confirmed chemodectoma in dogs from Brazil.
The malignant type of chemodectoma cannot be predicted by the initial clinical presentation or by the histologic appearance.
Several different factors can cause the tympanic membrane to assume a blue color, including a true hemotympanum, an idiopathic hemotympanum secondary to a cholesterol granuloma, long-standing secretory otitis media, a dehiscent high-riding jugular bulb, and occasionally a chemodectoma. (1)
CBT are the commonest paragangliomas of head and neck region and have been variously named chemodectomas and glomus tumors as well.
Travezan, "High altitude hypoxia and chemodectomas," Human Pathology, vol.
Glomus tympanicum chemodectomas: Radiographic and clinical characteristics.
According to the WHO classification, they are tumors belonging to the group of parasympathetic (non-chromaffin) branchiomeric paragangliomas, known as chemodectomas (1).
Four patients who underwent follow-up were tested in the presence of known pathology (recurrent chemodectomas, a previous pheochromocytoma, or iodine-131-meta-iodobenzylguanidine-hot multiple liver lesions), 4 were tested during a severe intercurrent illness (in 2 of these, 3-methoxytyramine was within the reference interval on repeat testing), and 2 were being treated with Levodopa.