chemo brain


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chemo brain

n.
Cognitive dysfunction, such as difficulties with memory, attention, or concentration, that results from chemotherapy. Also called chemo fog.

chemo brain

A colloquial term for difficulties with concentration and memory that may follow the administration of some forms of cancer chemotherapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are no specific tests to diagnose chemo brain or specific treatments for its symptoms.
'Chemo brain' is a symptom of cancer treatment that makes the brain a little fuzzy.
However, due to side effects such as fatigue, weight loss, "chemo brain," and others, only 2% multitask effectively.
I do want to share with you, though, what I have found hardest to deal with, what has prompted me to say "yes" to writing this article, when I have chemo brain and am lucky enough to remember that I haven't said the children can have chocolate for breakfast, lunch and dinner for a week, and that is this--the dehumanising experience of being treated like a number, a diagnosis, a treatment plan, a job to be done, a cancer.
Cancer-related cognitive dysfunction--commonly referred to as "chemo brain"--is a common side effect of chemotherapy, yet many integrative practitioners are unaware that it exists in their cancer-survivor patients.
William's project was The Effect of Magnet Fields on Planaria Regeneration, and Anne studied the relationship with among chemotherapy, radiation and cognitive dysfunction in her project, Behind the Fog: Discovering the Truth Behind "Chemo Brain."
"Chemo brain" appears even before chemotherapy starts, suggesting that more may be at play than a cognitive reaction to the medications, Bernadine Cimprich, Ph.D., said at the symposium.
That is not such a great increase in odds, given that there may be better treatments available by the time the cancer recurs, and that costs of treatment - in time, pain, and side-effects such as heart disease and cognitive impairment ("chemo brain"), as well as money - are high.
As many as 70 percent of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy also report what's commonly referred to as "chemo brain," often described as a "mental fog." While chemo brain was for many years dismissed, more recent research has shown that some cancer drugs can cause changes in the brain.
The study is relevant to the legions of cancer survivors who experience a frustrating decline in cognitive function after chemotherapy treatment, known as chemo brain.
The common thread in these cases is having received chemotherapy and subsequently experiencing a phenomenon now commonly called "chemo brain." This phenomenon is relatively unknown to addiction professionals, but can complicate ongoing recovery for individuals who have undergone cancer treatment.
Last year, researchers also at the University of Rochester reported success with modafinil in treating "chemo brain," a reduction in cognitive function that has been associated with chemotherapy.