chemism


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chemism

(1) A chemical activity, property or relationship.
(2) An obsolete, generic term for intermolecular forces between atoms and/or molecules.
References in periodicals archive ?
Research into residual characteristics of selected types of masonry units used in historical structures has manifested a need for further theoretic and experimental research of the effects of moisture, porosity and chemism on their physical and mechanical characteristics.
In the sphere of chemism objects are implicitly unified but are explicitly mutually external, even though they are no longer mutually indifferent.
Chemism is the oscillation between these two moments: the unity which neutralizes oppositional tension but which, due to its own character as a negative unity, collapses back into oppositional tension again.
by the self-mediating movement that the concept of chemism is.
Chemism has become "purpose" or "end" (72) an explicitly self-determining process for which externality counts as a mere means, and thus it is no longer reducible to mechanical or chemical determinacies insofar as 1) it cannot be exhaustively accounted for in terms of the latter, and 2) the latter has shown itself to be unsustainable in its own terms.
True, external objectivity does not determine the process to be what it is as it did in chemism and mechanism, but in being posited by the movement as its means it still appears to be external to purposive activity or the teleological relation.
Initially misconstruing emergence as indicating a mere inability to predict an outcome, he then goes on to suggest that "emergence presents a special problem for biology only if the relationship between biological and physical or chemical properties is fundamentally different from that between physical and chemical properties." (76) This fundamental difference is precisely what we can now maintain if Hegel is right in his account of the development from mechanism to chemism, chemism to teleology, and teleology to life.
'Chemism' accounts for the logical structure out of which teleological self-determination emerges.
The author chooses chemistry as the object of his case study because, as it happens, Hegel treats chemical objects twice in the System-first in the Logic as the subject matter of a special conceptual configuration ("Chemism"); and then again in the Philosophy of Nature as the content of a particular form of real process.
In spite of the ever-present "chemisms" of desire (the author's most famous neologism), the financier appears to possess a power of self-determination not available to Carrie Meeber, for instance, another Dreiser creation identified with the vicissitudes of capitalism.
Part of what Dylan's speaker faces on his doomed attempt at escape is "Louise," holding a "handful of rain, temptin' you to defy it." A prime example of Dylan's rain and blood imagery in which fate is marked by natural elements that speakers must attempt, yet fail, to defy, such images recall a naturalism reminiscent of Theodore Dreiser's "chemisms" through which human action is largely determined by natural forces allegorized in a tropism of plants, or a form of growth that responds only to external stimulus.