chemical senses


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chemical senses

the senses of smell and taste.

chem·i·cal sen·ses

(kem'i-kăl sens'ĕz)
The senses of smell and taste.
References in periodicals archive ?
The HCPA Air Care Summit brought together scientists and medical experts from Monell Institute for Chemical Senses, the University of Rochester, Brown University, the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children's Hospital, and the University of Minnesota.
Researchers from Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, found babies can build up a taste for healthy foods in the womb.
This tip is one of many in Parenting Soup's segment “The Motivation Toolbox.” Another popular segment is the “Picky Eater Survival Kit” with research-based advice like: “Know that 70% of children may have a bitter-sensitive gene which can contribute to a dislike for foods like vegetables,” or “It can take 10-20 exposures with a new food for a child to accept that food.” Drawing on food psychology studies from the Monell Chemical Senses Center and Cornell University Food and Brand Lab, the “Picky Eater Survival Kit” helps bring to light some rhyme and reason to the age-old challenge of kids and vegetables, helping parents focus on productive strategies for this often times challenging phase.
An animal with a diet devoid of vegetables may have little need to detect sugars, explains Gary Beauchamp, director of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, PA, and the lead author of the study.
The finding published in the Journal of Neuroscience by researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital - The Neuro, McGill University and the Monell Chemical Senses Center, Philadelphia, revises our understanding of the complex biology of the senses in the brain.
Pamela Dalton, Member, Monell Chemical Senses Center, Philadelphia, PA
The Study: Researchers at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, PA evaluated the responses of 61 infants to various concentrations of salt water.
"Sweet taste cells have turned out to be quite complex," said researcher Dr Karen Yee, from the Monell Chemical Senses Centre in Philadelphia, US.
The research, published in the latest issue of Chemical Senses, was launched to study if being hungry or full had an impact on people's ability to distinguish smells.
According to new research from the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, odors from skin can be used to identify basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of skin cancer.
Teff, PhD, a meta bolic physiologist at Monell Chemical Senses Center and Director of Translational Research at the Institute for Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism at the University of Pennsylvania.
"This is the most sophisticated work to date on metallic taste," says Michael Tordoff of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia.

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