chemistry

(redirected from chemical phenomenon)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

chemistry

 [kem´is-tre]
the science that treats of the elements and atomic relations of matter, and of the various compounds of the elements.
colloid chemistry chemistry dealing with the nature and composition of colloids.
inorganic chemistry the branch of chemistry dealing with compounds that do not contain carbon-carbon bonds (inorganic compounds).
organic chemistry the branch of chemistry dealing with organic compounds, those characterized by carbon-carbon bonds, i.e., all compounds containing carbon except oxides of carbon, carbides, and carbonates.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

chem·is·try

(kem'is-trē),
1. The science concerned with the atomic composition of substances, the elements, and their interreactions, as well as the formation, decomposition, and properties of molecules.
2. The chemical properties of a substance.
3. Chemical processes.
[G. chēmeia, alchemy]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chem·is·try

(kem'is-trē)
1. The science concerned with the atomic composition of substances, the elements and their interreactions, and the formation, decomposition, and properties of molecules.
2. The chemical properties of a substance.
3. Chemical processes.
[G. chēmeia, alchemy]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

chem·is·try

(kem'is-trē)
Science concerned with atomic composition of substances, the elements, and their interreactions.
[G. chēmeia, alchemy]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This finding reveals "a fundamentally new physical and chemical phenomenon," according to Adam Heller of the University of Texas at Austin, who considers the results "nothing short of revolutionary." Some materials, when perfectly clean, can bind to either oil or water but become committed to whichever one they adhere to first.
This brief monograph describes the multi-component molecular orbital methods and the hybrid type density functional theories used to analyze such chemical phenomenon as the H/D isotope effect and positronic systems.
In essence, these scientists highlight the fact that life based on replicating nucleic acids such as RNA and DNA is only one example -- albeit a powerful one -- of a general chemical phenomenon. His goal is to figure out the underlying "rules" behind chemical self-replication.